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3 reasons why you shouldn’t buy Google’s Chromebook Pixel

Google Chromebook Pixel

Today Google announced the Chromebook Pixel, an often-leaked touchscreen notebook computer that runs Chrome OS and is optimized for web browsing and cloud storage. The problem is that there is nothing that really sets the Chromebook Pixel apart from just about any other notebook computer to make it a compelling buy. In fact, it looks like a pretty stupid buy.

PRICE
Let's talk about the price of the Pixel for a moment. You can buy a fantastic Windows 8 PC or MacBook Air for the same price, both of which would blow away the Pixel in terms of usability. The Chromebook requires you to be connected to the Internet to be useful in any way, since it relies on cloud-based apps. A Mac or PC allows you to actually install apps on them, which you can launch when you are away from Wi-Fi, and get work done in.

Click to continue reading 3 reasons why you shouldn’t buy Google’s Chromebook Pixel


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Google Chromebook Pixel: 1.8GHz, 2560 x 1700 touchscreen display, $1,299

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Google, PC / Laptop

Google Chromebook Pixel

Today Google announced the Chromebook Pixel, a touchscreen notebook that seems to be Google's most confusing product offering. What's so weird about the Chromebook Pixel? We'll get to that shortly--first, let's go through a rundown of the specs.

Google is touting the Chromebook Pixel as the perfect notebook computer for anyone who spends the majority of their computing time in the browser and using cloud services. It's got a 12.85-inch display with a 3x2 aspect ratio, offering 18% more vertical space than a 16x9 display offers. Google is proud of this display, what with its 2,560 x 1,700 pixel resolution with 239 ppi density and 400nit brightness. Oh, and it's also a touchscreen, so you can interact with it directly with your fingertips.

Click to continue reading Google Chromebook Pixel: 1.8GHz, 2560 x 1700 touchscreen display, $1,299


Famous characters done up in 16 pixels

Posted by John Kilhefner Categories: Design, Internet, Video Games

Pixelated Cartman

Have you ever wondered what your favorite video game heroes, cartoon characters, or washed-up TV stars would look like if they were composed entirely of 16 pixels? If you have, then you're either a part of the aptly title blog "4x4 Pixels", or you did a little too much peyote your last time in Vegas. 

4x4 Pixels is an experimental pixel art project by David Stoll that reduces popular characters into pixelated versions of their former selves. 

Can you guess who the above character is? 

Here's a little hint: "Screw you guys...I'm going home!"

Read More | 4x4 Pixels

Manhattan: All the Five Burroughs for Your NES!

Posted by Finnian Durkan Categories: Design, Video Games

Manhattan All Five Burroughs NESHave you ever wondered what Manhattan would look like from the perspective of a Nintendo RPG in the mid-80’s?  No?  Then you’re either a commie or were born too late to get my clever Breakfast Club John Bender impressions; either way, you’re a neo-maxi-zoom-dweeby.  For all of you who answered ‘yes’ to my previous query or at least started reminiscing about that time that you beat Mike Tyson, then this little time waster is for you.  Brett Camper, an MIT alum and a true friend to the geek in all of us if there ever was one, has created an 8-bit map of NYC’s 5 Burroughs at 8bitnyc.com.  So dig out your Dr. Mario shirt, press up-down-up-down-left-right-left-right-b-a-select-start and go get functionally lost in what Mapquest would’ve looked like over a 1kbps dial-up modem circa 1985.


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