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Mell LazarusSomeone should biographize Mell Lazarus, who is still alive and—coming up on 83—still working. For a long time, he had two daily nationally syndicated comic strips, Miss Peach and Momma. He wrote a humorous novel based on his experience working for Al Capp (creator of Li’l Abner), he worked for Al Capp and was an active presence in the New York cartoon scene. Oh the stories he could probably tell. I hope he’s secretly putting them all in a book.

Continuing my series on cartooning and cartoonists, this Lazarus piece is pulled from a 1964 oversized saddle-stitched magazine from Allied Publications with the creatively-challenged title These Top Cartoonists Tell How They Create America’s Favorite Comics. It featured an introduction by Beetle Bailey’s Mort Walker and was compiled by Allen Willette.

Here’s Mell talking about how he does it:


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Mac mini HDMI

We’ve think that it’s a travesty that the only Apple product to sport an HDMI port has been the , especially when you consider that the Mac mini is pretty much the best Mac to have connected as a permanent part of your home theater setup. Well, it looks like that could possibly be changing with the next refresh, is AppleInsider sources are to be believed. They’re saying that there are prototype HDMI-based Mac minis floating through the normal channels within the company, and one or more of them are based on the NVIDIA MCP89 chipset, which would mean that the mini would stay on the Core 2 Duo architecture rather than moving on to the newer Core i3, i5, i7 processors if that doesn’t change. Of course, this is all rumor for now and there’s no release date or any other official info on the HDMI mini, so take this all with a grain of salt.

Read More | AppleInsider

Earth Blue Marble

What you see above is the highest resolution picture ever taken of planet Earth, recently uploaded to Flickr by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. The images took months to piece together, using thousands of true-color images in an attempt to minimize cloud coverage in the final picture, providing a better view of the land masses.

This spectacular “blue marble” image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. These images are freely available to educators, scientists, museums, and the public. This record includes preview images and links to full resolution versions up to 21,600 pixels across.

You can see the images in larger resolution, as well as an alternate view, over on the Goddard Space Flight Center Flickr page.

Read More | Flickr

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