On Gear Live: iPhone 6 Plus: 5.5-inch Retina HD display, optical image stabilization, bigger battery for $299

Latest Gear Live Videos

Google wants to buy Twitch.tv for $1 billion to integrate it into YouTube

Twitch.tv YouTube google

If you live in the world of video gaming, you probably know about Twitch. It's a sound concept. Watch other people play video games. I know I did it when I was nine, there was always a group of us kids around the the guy with the Gameboy playing Mario as we cheered him on.

Now it comes down to watching strangers play over the internet in real time and instead of five guys looking at a handheld console over their friend’s shoulder, it's 43 million people watching a sum total of 6 billion hours of video game coverage every single month.

Those are some big numbers, and if there is one company that has a good nose for big numbers and the internet, it's Google. Now sources connected to Google have let it slip that the internet giant YouTube, owned by Google, is looking to acquire Twitch for $1 billion.

Should the deal go through, Twitch would gain access to Google's nigh-unlimited resources to expand. It also could run afoul of United States monopoly laws, granting Google a majority share of internet video game streaming services.

Twitch alone accounted for 1.35% of all downstream bandwidth in North America in March, with Youtube raking in 18.67%.

It's still in the rumor stage unfortunately, with Youtube and Twitch refusing to confirm talks, naturally. We'll see what banner I'm streaming under when July rolls around.


Advertisement

Twitch streaming coming to Xbox One on March 11

Twitch Xbox One broadcast

Twitch streaming is finally coming to the Xbox One. Exclusive to the Playstation 4 since launch, Twitch allows live broadcasting of your video game session for others to watch in real-time. Now, on March 11th (the same day as the launch of Titanfall,) Xbox One owners will be able to get in on the action. Speak a simple command to Kinect to make it happen--"Xbox, broadcast"--and your stream is live.

Twitch says that the Xbox One version will offer enhanced features that support chat, following, and picture-in-picture in any corner so that you can interact with broadcasters.


Robert G. Baldwin: Rupe and Freddy

Posted by Tom Mason Categories: Editorials

Rupe 1Freddy is another one of those “forgotten” comic strips that ran for quite a long time, 1956-1980 and then disappeared. If you don’t know to look for it, you might never find it.

Continuing my series on cartooning and cartoonists, Rupe wrote about himself and his work back in 1964. This is pulled from an oversized saddle-stitched magazine from Allied Publications with the creatively-challenged title These Top Cartoonists Tell How They Create America’s Favorite Comics. It featured an introduction by Beetle Bailey’s Mort Walker and was compiled by Allen Willette.

Here’s Rupe on Rupe and Freddy: “Although I sign my work ‘Rupe,’ my real name is Robert G. Baldwin, and I was born in Washington, DC. I’m fifty years old, and I have five children, ages 11 to 22. Four boys and one girl. Frequently the family gathers around my finished work for discussion and, I hope, for a good laugh.


Advertisement