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HP TouchSmart PC gets refreshed, unboxed

just announced their newly updated PC. We were able to get our hands on one a little early, and figured we’d do our obligatory unboxing gallery. When we first saw the original back at 2007, we thought it was a huge, clunky computer. This new design actually seems to almost one-up Apple in a way. After all, the computer has a similar profile to an iMac, and is touch sensitive - you know, hence the whole TouchSmart name.

The model we got also features a wireless keyboard and mouse, both of which operate over RF technology rather than Bluetooth, which means sync issues should be non-existent. Oh, don’t get us wrong, this computer does include Bluetooth, as well as a host of other technologies. It’s packed to the brim with the latest technology too. While we’re on the subject, might as well list it all out, right?

Well, we’ve got an Intel Core 2 Duo T5850 processor, 4GB RAM, 500GB hard drive, SuperMulti DVD burner, 802.11b/g/n support, NVIDIA GeForce 9300M GS HD graphics card, and ships with Vista Home Premium 64-bit edition.

Hit up out HP TouchSmart PC unboxing gallery for the full goods.

Read More | HP TouchSmart PC unboxing

Gallery: HP TouchSmart PC gets refreshed, unboxed


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Senses Make Music Combos

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Design, Music, Toys

Unità ZeroWe dig anything that makes music electronically, especially if it involves a touch of creativity. Unità Zero takes the five senses and users hands and feet to create its own tunes. It consists of light feedback, video sequencing, and audio mixing. With 5 platform assemblies, the thought behind it is, “Five are the senses, many more the combinations of feelings. If senses describe reality, their combination is an ideal and intangible depiction.”

What more can we say except where does taste come in? Unità Zero makes its debut at dorkbot in Germany this week.

Read More | We Make Money Not Art

CES 2008 Non-Gravity Massage May be Uplifting

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: CES, CES 2008, Household

Zero-Gravity ChairHow nice that massages are now readily available for those of us that don’t want to pay someone else to do it. Human Touch says their HT-7450 Zero-Gravity Chair has all the latest tech for backs and feet. Sit down and it will recline in the proper position so that your body will feel less strain from gravity. The chair’s Acupoint Detection System scans you for key pressure points and performs the service with an emphasis on those areas that are particularly stressed out. We like the concept, we are just thinking maybe this is one product you should try before you buy. Some of us get nauseous just thinking about reclining more that we would like. Then there is that $3,999.99 price tag.

Read More | CES Planner

Update tabbed browsing on the iPhone/iPod touch with Tabulate

iPhone Tabulate

News in brief: Inventivelabs has released a JavaScript based hack for the and , which gives users far more control of their tabbed browsing experience. By simply adding their JavaScript bookmarklet to your computer and syncing it over to the iPhone you can quickly and easily open links in a page in a new tab, save links for later reviews, and manage tabs all in a surprisingly slick manner. It’s not a perfect solution being based in a bookmarklet, but adding this critical piece of functionality makes mobile Safari a far nicer experience.

Read More | Inventive Labs

QRIO Sparks Interest in Toddlers

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Editorial, Misc. Tech, Science

QRIOResearchers claim that adults can only hold an interest in a robot for about 10 hours but a new study proves this is not the case with children. The 2 foot tall QRIO (pronounced “curio”) was developed at the University of California with a crude sense of touch. When unleashed on a roomfull of toddlers between the ages of 18 to 24 months, he would turn his head, giggle, and even dance if they interacted with him. They became so used to his presence that he hung around about five months. The researchers noticed that the kids would touch his face first, then other parts of his body, just as they would with another child.

During another phase of testing, QRIO only danced when the tots touched him. Needless to say they quickly lost interest. When he again responded, the toddlers began to interact once more, but when his batteries went out, some of them cried. We wonder what long-lasting effect QRIO will have on these same children now that they have lost their new playmate.

Read More | Live Science

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