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Scanadu Scout bringing to life the medical Tricorder

Posted by Jason Diaz Categories: Household, Science

Scanadu Scout

Fans of the Star Trek franchise can totally appreciate the concept of the Tricorder. Now, what if I told you that it actually exists? Nelson De Brouwer founded Scanadu and actually went about inventing the Scanadu Scout. The Scout is round, small, and fits in one hand. It connects to a mobile app which stores your vital sign readings like temperature and oxygen levels in the blood. Scanadu also includes a plethora of heart readings like heart rate, ECG, HRV and PWTT (blood pressure.) It also has the ability for urine analysis or UA and, my personal favorites, reading test and stress levels. Scanadu Scout is being crowdsourced and sold for $199.99 on IndieGoGo. Check out the video that shows how it all works after the quick jump.

Click to continue reading Scanadu Scout bringing to life the medical Tricorder

Read More | Scanadu

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Guy born with total color blindness can now hear colors

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Science, Software, Videos

Cyborg Foundation Eyeborg

Neil Harbisson was born with achromatopsia, which means he can't see colors. He lives in a world of black and white. Not satisfied with having to remember that the sky is blue, or that lemons are yellow, he teamed up with Adam Montandon to develop a brain implant that they call the Eyeborg, which turns colors into sounds. In 2010, the Cyborg Foundation was born--an organization to help humans become cyborgs. Check out the fascinating details in the video after the jump, and be on the lookout for other projects from the Cyborg Foundation, including the Earborg (turns sounds into colors,) and the Speedbord (detects movement through earrings that vibrate.)

Click to continue reading Guy born with total color blindness can now hear colors


Stanford researchers create artificial skin that can feel pressure

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Science

Prosthetics have come a long way since the days of wooden legs. Now a team of Stanford researchers says it's taken a big step towards developing an artificial skin that can actually "feel" pressure and could someday help amputees and burn victims.

Spray-on carbon nanotubes and deformable silicone storing an electrical charge form the stretchy, sensitive material that's being billed as a synthetic skin prototype by the team of Stanford researchers led by associate professor of chemical engineering Zhenan Bao that developed it. The flexible, skin-like sensor can be stretched in any direction without tearing, losing its shape, or wrinkling and it's sensitive enough to detect a wide range of pressure.

"This sensor can register pressure ranging from a firm pinch between your thumb and forefinger to twice the pressure exerted by an elephant standing on one foot," Darren Lipomi, a Stanford post-doctoral researcher who helped develop the artificial skin sensor, told PopSci.com.

Click to continue reading Stanford researchers create artificial skin that can feel pressure


Exoskeleton allows paralyzed Berkeley student to walk at graduation

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Science

UC Berkeley's Austin Whitney has been paralyzed since July 2007 as the result of a car accident that hospitalized the 22-year-old for a total of 41 days. And now, thanks to the research project of a team of Berkeley engineers, the history and political science double-major was able to stand up out of his wheelchair and physically walk across the stage to accept his diploma at the university's May 14 graduation ceremony.

"Ask anybody in a wheelchair; ask what it would mean to once again stand and shake someone's hand while facing them at eye level," said Whitney in an interview with Berkeley's NewsCenter. "It will be surreal, like a dream."

The exoskeleton project, run by Berkeley professor of mechanical engineering Homayoon Kazerooni, focuses on user comfort and affordability as its two chief design points. Instead of, "over-engineering" the machine, as Kazerooni and his team of researchers note, they designed the exoskeleton to seamlessly work with as few components as possible. That means fewer motors to impact movement, which necessitates a smaller amount of sensors to track movement, which leads to a simpler device that costs less than the current market price of a typical exoskeleton: $100,000 on up.

Click to continue reading Exoskeleton allows paralyzed Berkeley student to walk at graduation


Steve Jobs taking another medical leave of absence from Apple

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Apple, Corporate News

steve jobs leave of absenceAlmost two years to the day from when Steve Jobs took medical leave from Apple to get a liver transplant, he has announced that he will be taking leave yet again to deal with his health. Just like last time, Steve will remain as CEO of Apple, and will be very involved in the major strategic decisions for the company. Tim Cook will take over day-to-day operations. It's unknown at this time whether the issues are related to Steve's bout with pancreatic cancer back in 2004, or the 2009 liver transplant, but whatever it is, we wish him a speedy and full recovery. We've got the email he drafted to his team after the jump.

Click to continue reading Steve Jobs taking another medical leave of absence from Apple


How the iPad changed the life of a disabled little boy

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Apple, Handhelds, Videos

While you can't really argue against the fact that the iPad has been a massive success for Apple, even outselling Mac computers last quarter, we know there are a bunch of people who write it off as just a  fad and who don't really see anything special about the device. However, it's becoming increasingly obvious that Apple was on to something that goes way beyond the argument of a closed App Store and the simple OS that so many complain about.

In the video above, you'll meet a 7-year old boy named Owen Cain. Owen was born with a debilitating motor-neuron disease that has left him almost completely motionless throughout his life. Needless to say, communication for him has been difficult. Then, a nurse had him try to play with an iPad, and he was able to use and interact with the device immediately, on his own. Take a look at the video above for the 


World’s first all-robotic surgery

Posted by John Kilhefner Categories: Science

The world’s first operation and anesthesia done by an all robot team was conducted at Canada’s McGill University Health Centre. The operation being one of extreme delicateness, a prostatectomy, was handled by two robots: DaVinci, a surgical robot, and McSleepy, an anesthetic robot. Both of whom were controlled by a team of surgeons from a workstation with 3D HD video control.

The robots allowed the team of surgeons to work with a precision not capable of by humans alone, allowing for a more precise and safe operation. The surgical team is planning to use this project to test more all-robotic surgery and anesthesia routines on more patients in different surgical situations. We are assured that the robots will not replace the doctors, but will only augment the surgical team to perform to their highest capabilities.

Read More | TG Daily

Wii Fit Used to Rehabilitate College Football Players

Posted by John Kilhefner Categories: Casual, Nintendo, Wii

Wii Fit RehabIn an effort to change the negative stigma associated with rehabilitation, many universities are opting for a more playful approach in their physical therapy routines. To this end, the Fit is employed as a “frame of reference” for college athletes. The athletes replicate a series of yoga positions, repeating each stance twice, once with their eyes closed. The next test involves shifting their weight to get on-screen marbles to fall into their respective holes. These balance scores are recorded, and in the event an athlete is injured they will serve as “base scores” for an athlete to replicate before being deemed fully recovered.

The director of research at the Ohio State Sports Concussion Program, Tamerah Hunt, had this to say:

“The athletes love it because what we’ve done is we’ve incorporated this fun game that they’re playing at home into their rehab system. But they’re also enjoying it at a time when they’re injured or at a time when their spirits are down, and they have to come into the athletic training room every day and they have to get all this treatment ... and it’s kind of a reaction of, ‘Oh, this is fun.’ ”

And who ever said all video games did is hurt people?

Read More | The Washington Post

3D video and gaming hazardous to your health

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Displays, HDTV, Movies

3D HDTV health hazard

When announced the 3DS, they made sure to make the press aware that children should have the 3D effect disabled if they were going to use the handheld console. Manufacturers of 3D HDTV sets have also included warnings that stated that there is a possible health risk to certain viewers, and have provided guidance that children should be limited in their 3D exposure. Year ago, Sega was going to release a 3D virtual reality headset that was quickly and quietly shelved, despite being seen as the future of gaming 15 years ago. Now news has come out that all of these warnings are based on years of research cover ups, and the details are finally being brought out now that 3D entertainment is much more readily available than it was in years past.

In a nutshell, the problem is that children under 7 are still developing their vision, and the 3D effect actually forces you into strabismus, essentially giving yourself temporary lazy eye. Since children are still developing, you run a severe risk of having them end up with permanent strabismus (or, lazy eye.) This is the reason that so many manufacturers want to be overly cautious with the use of 3D as it pertains to children, and it’s also a good reason for parents to sit up and take notice as well. Now that 3D HDTVs are on the market, we’ve gone from having super rare opportunity to view 3D content, to a bunch of animated movies incorporating it (so, 2-6 hours per month, depending on how often you go to those,) to potentially having 3D on in your home on a constant basis.

A lot of higher-ups within the consumer electronics industry point to the fact that the data is 15 years old, and that they may be new factors since the technology has advanced. However, the fact remains that all content that shows a different image to each eye (which is all 3D) forces you into strabismus. More research is needed to find out if 3D HDTV is safe for children, as well as adults, especially for prolonged lengths of time.

Read More | Audioholics

Kaweah Delta hospital orders 100 iPads

Kaweah Delta iPadIt was pretty obvious to us when we first saw the that it would definitely be big in the medical field. As it turns out, it looks like hospitals are catching on—case in point, California’s Kaweah Delta. The hospital has ordered 100 iPads for use around their campus. Nick Volosin, the hospital’s director of technical services, sees the iPad as replacing laptops for things like email, checking X-rays, EKG results, and more.

Read More | PC World

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