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Researchers Use Ionic Cooling for Laptops

Ionic CoolerAlthough Sharper Image and its Ionic Breeze purifier went belly up, Tessera and researchers from the University of Washington have teamed to adapt ionic cooling in a smaller form for laptops and other electronics. Supposedly the technology can extract about 30% more heat than a traditional fan at about half the power. Washington U’s Alexander Mamishev originally conducted research in 2006 before Tessera licensed it. And while the lifespan is not yet up to the 30,000 hours of life target, we may see it come to market next year.

Read More | MIT Technology Review

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Paralyzed Monkey Relearns Movement

Monkey Brain

Researchers at the University of Washington have successfully tested a simple approach to help those who are paralyzed. Their method is to use a direct connection between nerve cells and muscles to reteach the brain. The brain-machine interface was used to teach monkeys with wrist paralysis to play a video game. While most scientists were trying to train them to make movements, the team used a biofeedback meter and applesauce (as reward) to change their brain activity.

Read More | Seattle PI

Vocal Joystick Needs No Hands

Vocal JoystickThe University of Washington has designed Vocal Joystick software to assist those with disabilities. “Ahh” means go northwest, “ooo” makes it go south, and “ohh” makes the cursor go southeast. Vowel sounds make circles, while the voice volume controls the speed. A simple clicking noise opens a link. The researchers have already tested their joystick at the UW Medical Center and are about to begin the next round. The system only needs a mic, a PC with sound card and a voice to operate.

Read More | Physorg

Hubble Tracks Black Holes on the Internet

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Internet, Science, Software

Black Holes MapAccording to Ethan Katz-Bassett, a University of Washington grad student, there are black holes on the Internet. Funded by the National Science Foundations, he and his advisor Arvind Krishnamurthy designed a program to find them. They make sure that the problem is not just a temporary glitch on a site and mark them on a global map. The pair is hoping that service providers will use Hubble, named after the Space telescope that charts black holes, to track down their own issues. The findings will be presented at the Usenix Symposium being held next week in San Francisco.

Read More | MSNBC

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