On Gear Live: Apple reports $45.6 billion Q2 2014 revenue: 43.7m iPhones, 16.3m iPads, 4.1m Macs sold

Latest Gear Live Videos

How the Windows 8 Developer Preview works on a MacBook Air

Windows 8 Macbook Air

Microsoft released its Windows 8 Developer Preview and free developer tools to the public for download last night. It's intended to help developers start building apps for the forthcoming newest version of Microsoft's operating system. But that won't stop hordes of regular users from installing it anyway, just to get a sneak peek.

We got our hands on a copy of the software and figured that the most compelling system to install it on was a Apple MacBook Air 13-inch running Boot Camp. For the most part, the Windows 8 Developer Preview installed and ran smoothly on the Air despite being the first public build. It's stable enough that I didn't encounter heat issues, the infamous blue-screen of death (yet), or even a single application crash.

There are some key MacBook Air components that Windows 8 didn't recognize, however. These included the speakers, SD card reader, webcam, and Bluetooth, although a sophisticated user could probably tinker with current Windows drivers and get some of them to work. The good news is that the essential ones, such as Wi-Fi, the keyboard, trackpad, and USB ports, worked perfectly.

Click to continue reading How the Windows 8 Developer Preview works on a MacBook Air


Advertisement

Video: 5-minute highlight reel of the Windows 8 Developer Preview

Yesterday at its Build conference, Microsoft unveiled Windows 8 to the world during the opening keynote. We know that a lot of you don't have the patience to sit through over an hour of presentations, so we've got the short version above. Get a look at all the new Windows 8 developer preview hotness in the five-minute video above. Get a look, and let us know what you think in the comments!


Microsoft Windows 8 Developer Preview launches at BUILD

Windows 8 developer preview

Microsoft has officially launched the Windows 8 Developer Preview at its BUILD conference this morning, with the download actually becoming available later this week in the new Windows Dev Center, but if you're at BUILD, you'll get your copy there. In addition, they've also announced the Windows Store - yep, it's pretty much like the Mac App Store, but, for Windows. The store will include Metro-style apps (think Windows Phone 7 UI) as well as the more traditional Windows apps that you're used to. We'll be going hands-on with the Windows 8 Developer Preview in just a bit, and will report back with our thoughts!


Parallels Desktop 7 for Mac available September 6

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Apple, Microsoft, PC / Laptop, Software

Parallels Desktop 7 for Mac

The folks over at Parallels have been hard at work on perfecting the software for OS X Lion, and now it's ready. Parallels Desktop 7 for Mac will go on sale on September 6th, bringing a bunch of Lion features to apps that you're running in Windows. Expect the ability to use Lion features like Full Screen, LaunchPad, and Mission Control with Windows programs, along with the ability to run multiple copies of OS X Lion and Windows at the same time. On the performance end of things, Parallels Desktop 7 is 60 percent faster than the previous version for resuming Windows, and 45 percent faster for 3D graphics. ALso new is improved 5.1 surround sound, and support for 7.1 surround as well.

On September 6th you'll be able to download a trial or full version of Parallels Desktop 7, as well as purchased boxed software from retailers. The standard price is $79.99, while the Switch to Mac edition is $99.99. If you're switching over from VMware Fusion (Parallels competitor) you'll get a special price of $49.99, and if you're upgrading from a previous version of Parallels, you also qualify for the $49.99 price. Lastly, if you're a student, you get it for $39.99.

We'll be testing out all of the new features of Parallels Desktop 7 for Mac, and will report back with our thoughts soon.


Bleeding Edge TV 389: Windows Phone 7 Mango Preview

We give you a look at Windows Phone 7 Mango, technically known as Windows Phone 7.5. Mango introduces a ton of new features into the Windows Phone 7 library, and at GDGT Seattle we were able to chat with Andy Colley from the Microsoft Windows Phone team to get a thorough walkthrough of everything new, like Bing Audio, Bing Vision, Smart DJ, Linked Inbox, and much, much more.

Big thank you to Carbonite and JackThreads for sponsoring the show - be sure to check them out! Carbonite offers off-site backup of your computer, and you can get a 15-day free trial (no credit card needed!) by visiting Carbonite and using promo code TPN. As for JackThreads, we've got exclusive invite codes that give you $5 to use towards anything you'd like.


Windows 8 reinvents Windows interface by bringing in Windows Phone 7 shell

Microsoft finally figured out how to effectively bring full-blown Windows to tablets: make it look a lot like Windows Phone 7.

In the first public unveiling of the upcoming Windows 8 interface, Microsoft's president of Windows, Steven Sinofsky, showed off a radically altered Windows start screen that features user-configurable tiles and looks almost nothing like Windows 7. The demo took place during this week's D9 conference in southern California.

The new interface supports gestures, snap, pin, cloud apps, new concepts like a basket for files you'll want to share between apps and services, and a hidden task bar on the right side of the screen. The updated OS is designed to work on "the hundreds of millions of PCs already out in the market," Sinofsky said.

Since it's still Windows, all devices and apps that work with Windows 7 will run on Windows 8, said Sinofsky, adding that consumers will only have to choose which device to run it on. "The interface scales from about 7-inches to a wall-screen display," explained Sinofsky.

In addition to the development screen, Microsoft showed Windows 8 running on tablets from Samsung and Lenovo.

Click to continue reading Windows 8 reinvents Windows interface by bringing in Windows Phone 7 shell


Microsoft says Windows Phones don’t store location history

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Cell Phones, GPS, Microsoft

Windows Phone 7 location data

Microsoft has confirmed that Windows Phones don't store location history in a manner similar to the iPhone, which records the location data in an unencrypted file. The news that some iOS devices keep location data came to light last week, although Apple warns users of the practice (if not the precise methods) in the fine print of the phone's terms of service.

Microsoft told us unequivocally that phones running Windows Phone 7 do not store location history. Like most other phones, the platform offers plenty of location-based apps, and those apps require user consent before they begin tracking. Windows Phones also offer the common feature of a "global switch" that lets the user disable all location services, and Microsoft says its "Find My Phone" service keeps only the phone's most recent location.

We also contacted Nokia, RIM, Google, and HP about how the companies' mobile platforms store location data, and none, save Microsoft, have responded. It's been confirmed independently that Google Android also tracks and stores location data.

Click to continue reading Microsoft says Windows Phones don’t store location history


Microsoft bringing the ribbon to Windows 8 Explorer

Windows 8 ribbon UI

Perhaps people are overloaded on Apple rumors because the rumor mill has shifted to Microsoft and its next operating system, now referred to in the blogosphere as Windows 8.

The latest rumor is that Windows 8 will incorporate the "ribbon" interface with Windows Explorer. The feature - which put more functionality front-and-center rather than hidden behind drop-down menus - was first incorporated into Office 2007. With the release of Windows 7, it was also added to Paint and WordPad. A version of the "ribbon" interface is also included in Microsoft Office for Mac 2011.

According to Within Windows, Microsoft is thinking about adding the ribbon to Windows Explorer in the next iteration of the OS, but nothing is set in stone.

"In early builds of Windows 8, this Ribbon UI is only half-finished and, frankly, of dubious value," the blog wrote. "In fact, based on the divergent ways in which various related UI elements are repeated around the window frame, we get the idea that the use of the Ribbon in Explorer is, in fact, quite controversial inside the halls of Microsoft's Redmond campus."

Click to continue reading Microsoft bringing the ribbon to Windows 8 Explorer


Bleeding Edge TV 361: Windows Phone 7 preview

Wanna get an in-depth preview of what Microsoft has in store for ? In this episode, we chat with Brian Seitz of the Windows Phone team, and he gives us a tour through the entire Windows Phone 7 interface. We get a look at a bunch of features and hubs, including things like social networking integration, Microsoft Office, Xbox Live, photos, friends, Zune, Outlook, and much more. Seeing how Microsoft was able to tie a bunch of their different service offerings (Xbox, Office, Zune, Bing, Explorer, etc.) so tightly into one device is impressive, and definitely gives us hope as they gear up for the launch of Windows Phone 7 devices this fall.


Parallels Desktop 5 build 9370 released

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: PC / Laptop, Software

Parallels Desktop 5 for mac 9370

For all of you who run Windows and Linux virutal machines on your Mac by way of Parallels Desktop 5, you should know that the company has released an update this morning aimed at improving performance and enhancing compatibility. The update is recommended for all users of Parallels Desktop 5 for Mac, and is free. Here’s the list of changes:

  • Mac folders shared with Windows now work correctly with MS Outlook, Lotus, Quicken and other Windows applications.
  • Support for Autodesk Revit 2011 was fixed.
  • MS Office 2010 activation is preserved in Boot Camp virtual machines.
  • OpenGL now works correctly in Ubuntu 10.04 virtual machines.
  • Virtual machines using Boot Camp partitions on 512 GB solid-state disks (SSDs) now work correctly.
  • The problem with invisible virtual machines list on new MacBook Pros (released in early 2010) was fixed.
  • A rare problem with Windows virtual machine’s screen turning black after upgrading to Mac OS X v10.6.3 was fixed.
  • Problems with Parallels Service stopping to respond when the Parallels Desktop settings file is corrupt were fixed.
  • Problems with screen resolution in Mac OS X Server v10.6.3 virtual machines were fixed.

You can get a copy of Parallels Desktop 5 for Mac for $10 off with $175 in free software.


Advertisement