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Museum of Modern Art begins collecting video games for new exhibit

Posted by John Kilhefner Categories: Action, Adventure, Culture, Puzzle

Museums must have something against Roger Ebert. First, the Smithsonian American Art Museum holds an exclusive video game event earlier this year, and now the New York City Museum of Modern Art is following suit.

MoMA is officially bringing in 14 videogame classics to begin an ongoing gaming collection that will go on display in March 2013 in the Philip Johnson Architecture and Design Galleries. Currently, the included games feature obvious choices such as Pac-Man, modern games like Portal, and obscure games like vib-ribbon. The collection MoMA is aiming for consists of about 40 titles, which will fall in as part of a "new category of artworks."

Read More | MoMA

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Famous characters done up in 16 pixels

Posted by John Kilhefner Categories: Design, Internet, Video Games

Pixelated Cartman

Have you ever wondered what your favorite video game heroes, cartoon characters, or washed-up TV stars would look like if they were composed entirely of 16 pixels? If you have, then you're either a part of the aptly title blog "4x4 Pixels", or you did a little too much peyote your last time in Vegas. 

4x4 Pixels is an experimental pixel art project by David Stoll that reduces popular characters into pixelated versions of their former selves. 

Can you guess who the above character is? 

Here's a little hint: "Screw you guys...I'm going home!"

Read More | 4x4 Pixels

Guillermo del Toro Announces Several Video Game Projects

guillermo del Toro gaming

Film director Guillermo del Toro, of Pan’s Labyrinth and Hellboy fame, is currently set to lend his artistic vision to a field that has long fought for its place in the artistic realm. The debate as to whether or not video games can be considered art was recently set ablaze when acclaimed film critic Roger Ebert blogged that “no video gamer now living will survive long enough to experience [video games] as an art form”. While Ebert admits to having no desire to ever play a video game, hardly the same sentiment applies to del Toro, who previously stated that Flower is “like haiku poetry.” Almost a year later Ebert referred to the same game as “decorative interest on the level of a greeting card”. The two are definitely polar opposites when it comes to video games and art. However, with del Toro’s unique artistic direction poised to influence the gaming industry, can the opinionated Ebert change his anti-gaming ways? Or will del Toro’s gaming projects miss the mainstream mark like other filmmakers’ ventures into the gaming world?

Read More | MTV

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