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Turns out texting while driving is even more dangerous than we thought

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Cell Phones, Transportation

Texting and drivingIn case you need and more proof that you shouldn't be texting while driving (or really, doing anything at all with your smartphone,) it's just been found that the practice is more dangerous than originally thought:

Drivers were asked to stop when they saw a flashing yellow light, and their reaction times were recorded, Yager said.

The typical time it took a driver who was not texting to respond to the flashing light was one to two seconds. But when the driver was texting, the reaction time extended to three to four seconds, and the texting motorist was 11 times more likely to miss the flashing light altogether.
Yager said the reaction time was the same whether the driver was typing a message or reading one.

One in five motorists admit to texting, emailing, and checking social networks while driving.


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Teens sending 3,339 texts per month on average

Posted by John Kilhefner Categories: Cell Phones

New reports from Nielsen show that teens are sending and/or receiving an average of 3,339 text messages every month, or 111 texts per day.

The statistic shows that girls are more prone to texting than males are, averaging 4,050 texts per month; while males averaged 2,539 texts a month. While text usage is rising, voice calls are declining rapidly. Teenagers spend 646 minutes per month talking on their cell phones on average. This is a 14% decrease from last year.

However, males take the lead when it comes to browsing the web, averaging 75 MB of mobile data per month. Females only averaged 53 MB in this category. Even so, both sexes have seen an extraordinary leap over last years stats of 11 MB and 17 MB of data per month. 

Read More | TG Daily

Arctic May Lose Summer Ice Within 30 Years

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Science

Global Ice ExtentA recent study claims that the Arctic may lose its ice cover in summer in as few as 30 years, as opposed to the end of the century, as the the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007 predicted. While that study used 11 models to base their facts on, Muyin Wang and James Overland picked 6 of the 23 now available and noted that the change will probably come from the average figure of 32 years, but may be as early as 11. Most scientists figure that parts of northern Canada and Greenland will still have ice in summer.

Read More | University Washington News

Watch YouTube For College Credit

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Internet, Misc. Tech, Videos

YouTube ClassPitzer College has begun to offer college credit for students that watch YouTube. Approximately 35 students attend the class where they watch videos and make comments about them. They are also encouraged to submit their own work. Professor Alexandra Juhasz, who set up the “Learning From YouTube” course, believes that one can learn about the “corporate-sponsored democratic media expression.” This sounds to us like one of those excuses not to have to issue and/or do real homework on the part of both the instructor and students, and suspect it will soon have the popularity of such classes as basket weaving and Dummy Math 101.

Read More | ABC

Researcher: Studies Lack Strong Evidence Linking Video Games, Aggressive Behavior

Posted by Christopher Sasaki Categories: Culture

GTA The GamePolitics blog has received excerpts from a new meta-analysis of the various studies attempting to link video game play with aggressive behavior. The study’s researcher, Christopher Ferguson has dissected 25 recent studies on video game violence and found that in general, while video game playing increased aggressive thoughts support for a link between game play and actual behavior was limited. Overall, those studies that employed better standards for measuring aggression showed lesser effects from video game play. Ferguson also found that publication bias played a large role in the studies; studies that showed stronger links seemed to be favored over those that did not.

Read More | GamePolitics via Next Generation


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