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Russian engineer builds radio-controlled hovering DeLorean car

Ever since I was a child, I always wanted a hover car. More so, I wanted a car what was iconic. Now, granted, any hover car would be iconic, but I wanted something that would be undeniably cool regardless of what era the car was seen in. Well, with a few bucks, some creativity, and a little time on your hands, the dream is now possible.

Back over in the Motherland, a Russian engineer has built a radio-controlled hover car based on the DeLorean from Back to the Future. His mantra for the project is “Where we’re going, who needs roads?” which we find appropriate for the build. Though this isn’t a full size replica, it’s still one hell of a bragging right. Check the video above!


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2010 Holiday Gift Guide: Parrot AR.Drone Quadricopter

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Features, Toys, Techies, Teens, Under $500

Parros AR.Drone quadricopter

The Parrot AR.Drone is one of the coolest holiday gifts this season, and as such, it's a natural fit for our 2010 Holiday Gift Guide. It's basically like a flying real-life video game that you can play indoors or out. With its on-board Wi-Fi system, you can even control the copter from an iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad. On-board cameras let you pilot the AR.Drone through complex flight maneuvers and destroy enemy targets. The iOS piloting app is a free download from the iTunes App Store. The copter also has a built in accelerometer, gyros, ultrasonic sensors, two video cameras, and more. It's constructed of carbon fiber and high-resistance plastic, and it's available in three colors. You can get it now for $299 from Amazon

Read More | Parrot AR.Drone Quadricopter

Casio Tough Movement Watches

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Wearables, Misc. Tech

Casio Solar WatchCasio is working on Tough Movement for radio controlled solar watches. Using metal and plastic to reduce its weight, the chronograph style is reduced by 0.55mm while the analog is 4.11mm smaller. The watches will be shock resistant and have a hand correction with LED. The hands are detected at 55 minutes and correct themselves if the time doesn’t coincide with the IC counter. The company intends to use the technology on both their Oceanus and G-Shock series. Look for the GS-1200 to debut this September with a price of ¥42,000 (~$388.00) in Japan.

 

Read More | Tech-On

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