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URME Mask lets you wear someone else’s face to avoid surveillance

Posted by Ariel Levin-Waldman Categories: Design, Misc. Tech

URME Mask

Surveillance technology has gotten pretty impressive. Camera resolution combined with facial recognition means you can be identified just about all the time, and in many jurisdiction in the United States it is actually illegal to wear a mask in public if it is likely to cause concern. What is the average guy supposed to do to hide from the high tech eyes of a watchful government?

You can always try wearing someone else's face.

I promise it's less creepy than it sounds. Still pretty creepy though. The URME Mask, a realistically detailed 3D printed replica of the creator's face, comes to us by way of Indiegogo. Yes, you read that right, the entire premise of the URME is to make everyone look just like Leo Selvaggio, the Chicago-based artist that that brainstormed the idea.

And he is apparently not alone in thinking this. It's a little disturbing but he has more than doubled his originally asked for goal of $1,000. There are people out there willing to pay good money to wear Leo's skin.

Click to continue reading URME Mask lets you wear someone else’s face to avoid surveillance

Read More | Indiegogo

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My one big 2014 wish for the tech sector: Bring back privacy

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Editorial, Features

edward snowden privacy

One of my journalist friends, Monica Guzman, sent me an email asking what I'm looking forward to for 2014 as it pertains to technology and gadgets. There's a lot that I'm looking forward to, since I see 2014 as a marquee year--one that we will look back on as having brought us devices and convergence that we've been waiting for, for years. However, when I thought about it more, there was one thing that was more important to me. Here's how I responded:

Click to continue reading My one big 2014 wish for the tech sector: Bring back privacy


Apple, Microsoft, Google & others petition US government for transparency in data requests

Posted by Jason Diaz Categories: Apple, Corporate News, Google, Microsoft

US Gov Data Request

Several big named tech giants like Apple, Google, Facebook and Microsoft are publicly requesting that the National Security Agency (NSA) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) allow them to transparently publish more information regarding the controversial data mining operations and surveillance programs held by US government agencies.

Dubbed SpyGate, the legitimate controversy has made headlines over legislation of section 215 of the Patriot Act and section 702 of the FISA amendment ACT. Not to mention the whistleblower saga that has ensued after former NSA employee and current on the run globetrotter, Eric Snowden, leaked details about the covert operation infamously known as Prism. Many of the allegations summarized in the massive leak state that the US government has backdoor access to the servers of many leading private industry companies and direct access to major US telecommunication carriers. With such access, the government collects and monitors millions of American's information not limited to just metadata. Many private companies have signed a petition of transparency that includes Apple, Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Skype and many others. Below is the petition letter in its entirety.

Click to continue reading Apple, Microsoft, Google & others petition US government for transparency in data requests

Read More | The Next Web

BlackBerry Almost Ready for Obama

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Cell Phones, Handhelds

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President Obama’s BlackBerry 8830 seems to be on the way. It is in the final stages of development with the NSA overlooking the encryption software SecureVoice. He will be able to use it around the White House and when he travels. Michelle and VP Biden will also get one. By the way, if you visit the White House, you will have to check your BlackBerry, iPhone, cell phone or other electronic device at the door.

 

 

Read More | Washington Times

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