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Cloning Your Pooch

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Household, Science

TriggerFor years people have saved their pets through taxidermy, including Roy Rogers, who had Trigger and Bullet stuffed and placed in his museum. Now, thanks to a So. Korean company, you can have your pup forever immortalized by cloning. RNL Bio will gratefully accept your $150,000 and claims that there is a 25% possibility of success. Seoul National University will be performing the actual procedure and although RNL prefers creating guard dogs, they won’t turn down a beloved pet. While this is a nice idea if you adored your dog, you might want to double think the idea if he/she was hesitant to become housebroken when a puppy.

Read More | Korea Times

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Know How Much Fat You Really Have

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Misc. Tech, Science

Belly Fat Scanner

When you go for your annual check-up next year, you may be more embarrassed than usual. Tanita has created a Belly Fat Scanner that will measure your stomach and then a low electric current scans for about 30 seconds to get the fat ratio. The results are then transmitted to a work station by its numbers. The only information used is the sex of the patient, as opposed to the height and weight measurements that are used to determine BMIs. This is definitely not the test to take too soon after the New Year.

 

Read More | Technovelgy

Instymeds Dispenses InstyDrugs

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Household, Misc. Tech, Science

InstymedsIt won’t be long before pharmacists are replaced by InstyMeds, vending machines that can be placed in clinics, hospitals, and doctors offices. The current model holds 100 different drugs and 8 to 22 bottles of each drug. It labels and dispenses tablets, capsules, inhalers, sprays, creams and ointments, suspensions and syrups. Using PC writing software, the physician merely enters the patient’s information. The patient then uses a touchscreen to enter name and date of birth, chooses a printed prescription or fills it there and inserts cash or credit card. Insurance companies are billed automatically for co-pays. Not only will this cut down on handwriting errors, it may cut back on pharmaceutical errors, as long as it is loaded properly.

Read More | Instymeds Product Page

Doctors Use PMPs for Stethoscopes

iPodNext time you see your doctor sporting an iPod at work, do not think that she/he is slacking off. Neil Skjodt, of the University of Alberta, claims that even the most modern of stethoscopes do not have the purity or clarity of sound of MP3 players. He also mentioned that they have the added feature of being able to store recordings for future reference. While PMPs will surely not replace stethoscopes, we suspect that the technology will contribute to the future of medical care in finding such complications as heart murmurs.

Read More | News.com.au

Spam Lists Circulate in E-Mail

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Editorial, Internet, Misc. Tech

SpamHave you ever wondered how you get on spam lists? Aside from the obvious way of signing up for sites and having them spread around your name and e-addy, we received this scam

offer in our e-mail for a list of almost 800,000 licensed MDs in the U.S. from Denmark. It features over 17,000 e-mail addresses as well as primary and secondary specialties fields, first and last name, title, address (city, state, zip, and county), medical school attended, location of residency training, phone, fax, website, graduation year, and hospital or group association. The price for this supposed prize is $397.00 and comes with a bonus list of hospitals, dentists, and other health related industries tossed into the deal. How’s that for feeling a Big Brother pinch?


“Fantastic Voyage” Becomes a Reality

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Misc. Tech, Science

Fantastic VoyageIsraeli scientists from Techion University have teamed with the College of Judea and Samaria to create a one millimeter bot that can be inserted into a patient’s bloodstream, with no miniature Rachel Welch or Stephen Boyd needed. The mini-robot is composed of a hub and tiny arms that can hold on to vessel walls even upstream, and is controllable by its operators almost indefinitely. A similar bot has been created by Kyoto University but its size is one centimeter, too large to get into the smaller spaces. What a pity that Isaac Asimov couldn’t be here to see him novelization come to fruition.

Read More | Haaretz

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