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30 Seconds to Mars Almost Ruined by Lawsuit

30 Seconds to Mars

30 Seconds to Mars were almost destroyed by a legal battle. The group admit their future was in doubt when Virgin Records and EMI Music sued them for $30 million in 2009, citing breach of contract, and because the sum was so huge, the band had no choice but to fight the case in order to save their futures.

"The last record we had quite a few problems. We battled our record company. They sued us for $30 million. We made a film about it called Artifact, a documentary that is coming out later this summer. It was mind-blowing, The number was too big to conceptualize it but it was very real. Not only was there the financial risk at stake but there was the risk of losing our careers. We felt we had an important and just fight. I am glad we stood up for what we believed in. Ultimately we were victorious and we are here. The story went exactly as it was supposed too," frontmnan Jared Leto said.

Click to continue reading 30 Seconds to Mars Almost Ruined by Lawsuit


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Apple signs up EMI Music to be part of cloud music service

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Apple, Corporate News, Music,

Apple signs EMI

Apple has reportedly secured a licensing agreement with EMI Music, adding to an earlier deal with Warner Music Group in its alleged efforts to launch a cloud-based music locker for iTunes users.

If the CNET report is true, Apple only needs to close deals with Sony Music Entertainment and Universal Music Group now before it secures unprecedented, legitimate access to music from all "Big Four" labels.

In March, Amazon launched its cloud music locker without such rights and faced threats of legal action; it is now reportedly in talks with the labels to secure licensing agreements. Google launched Google Music at its Google I/O event a couple weeks ago.

In April, CNET reported that Apple had inked a deal with Warner Music and "at least one of the remaining three" major music labels. Apple has not officially acknowledged the development of a cloud-based music storage service, but speculation is rife after reports "confirming" the development with unnamed sources. Furthermore, the company recently built a massive data center in North Carolina, reportedly meant to host a video streaming service.

Click to continue reading Apple signs up EMI Music to be part of cloud music service


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