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Woman Charged Heavily for Downloads

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Editorial, Internet, Music

RIAA logoBack in October of 2007, Jammie Thomas-Rasset was charged with copyright infringement of 24 songs and decided to fight the Recording Industry Association of America and Capitol Records instead of settling. But now a jury has decided that she is guilty and must pay 1.92 million dollars, which comes out to about $80,000 per tune. While it is possible that the RIAA may still settle for less, Ms. Thomas-Rasset is only the first of 20,000 that may be brought to court and is certainly being used to tell us all that her action was a no-no bigtime.

Read More | Mashable

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Four Found Guilty in Pirate Bay Case

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Internet, Movies, Music

Pirate Bay logoA Stockholm court found the 3 founders and one “patron” behind The Pirate Bay guilty of collaboration to violate copyright laws. They were sentenced to a year in jail and must pay $3.6 million in damages to media companies. The site allows free exchange of movies, music, games and software with its 3.5 million users but does not host them. As yet, there is no order to shut down the site and the defendants plan on appealing the judgment.

Read More | CNN

Apple to Settle nano Class-Action Suit

oPod nanosIt looks like there will be a settlement in the ongoing 4 year, $22 million class-action suit against Apple. The company must set aside that amount for first-gen nano owners with scratched screens. According to the suit, many of them weren’t “coated” and were subject to “excessive scratching.” Those who received a slip case with their iPod may be entitled to $15.00, while those who did not can get $25.00. A judge still needs to sign off on the suit and a hearing will take place April 28. More information is available here.

Read More | CNBC

Psion Asks Companies Not to Use “Netbook”

Netbook AdSo much turmoil over such a small thing, literally. Psion owns the trademark to the Netbook, a device they actually created and later discontinued. But it seems as if they would like to make sure that no one else uses the name. jk on the run first found about the dilemma, and seems to be in contact with their “people” who want to make their intentions perfectly clear. They have sent out letters to retailers and manufacturers who are using the term in their products. We were thinking they should be flattered by all the fuss, but what do you think? And what term should be, as they call it, a “legitimate generic?” Mini-book? Notebook-minus? Should we stage a protest or hold a contest?

Read More | jk On The Run

MPAA Sues Pullmylink

Big BrotherThe Motion Picture Association of America is suing Pullmylink and says that the site promotes and makes a profit from media that infringes on copyrights. This is the seventh time that the MPAA has done such an action since last year. They have not yet gone after sites such as YouTube. We are thinking that they look at this as free advertising as opposed to serious pirating, which they say has cost them billions of dollars of loss.

Pullmylink claims it has 12,000 visitors a day and more than 39,000 pages of free content. Their Superpass offers 100+ ad-free radio stations, 10 music downloads a month, RealPlayerPlus, and live feeds, such as the one for Big Brother. With their 14 day free trial, you had better hurry, just in case.

Read More | Reuters

Viacom Sues YouTube for $1 Billion

YouTube logo In the continuing struggle with YouTube, Viacom, which is owned by Google, has taken YouTube to court for the astounding sum of $1 billion. Viacom claims that the site has shown 160,000 of its videos without express permission.

“Their business model, which is based on building traffic and selling advertising off of unlicensed content, is clearly illegal and is in obvious conflict with copyright laws,” Viacom said.
We’re thinking that this may be the first in a long series of lawsuits to get YouTube to respect the legal rights of copywritten material. The list will probably include such companies as GE and NBC. News Corp and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban have already begun legal proceedings against the media giant.

Read More | MSN

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