On Gear Live: Ask Andru: Which Macs can run OS X Yosemite?

Latest Gear Live Videos

Will the Nintendo 3DS pave the way for a 3D iPhone?

iphone 3d

The new Nintendo 3DS promises to be a success not only because it actually works well and does indeed provide a 3D image without any glasses or aid whatsoever, but because it takes amusing 3D photos and is just fun to play with.

When all is said and done, the Nintendo 3DS may actually accomplish what Fuji has been promoting and what many 3D hobbyists have tried: popularizing 3D photography for everyday use.

And, yes, we know that it's a gimmick. But it's a cool gimmick.

After taking a few 3D pictures of just about anything, you'll find that they are so compelling that it is hard to express the odd joy you get from them. This is the key to the eventual success of home 3D. It has always failed in the past, because it was somebody else's 3D. It was never personal.

Photography itself never flourished as a hobby when the cameras were the big bulky clunkers utilized by Matthew Brady and others. Think about this. Photography was nothing new during the Civil War in the 1860's, but all the photos were done by a limited number of pros. You have to wonder what the Civil War would have been like if everyone had a cell phone camera like we do today.

Then Kodak produced the Brownie and gave photography to everyman. Next thing you knew, photography became the number one hobby in the world. 3D is following that same pattern. It's just odd that a game company, Nintendo, is the Kodak and the 3DS is the Brownie.

Click to continue reading Will the Nintendo 3DS pave the way for a 3D iPhone?


Advertisement

Silent Hill returns to theaters in new 3D film

Posted by John Kilhefner Categories: Movies, Video Games

Silent Hill is returning to theaters, but this time with a Michael J. Bassett penned script instead of Roger Avary. The flick will be based off one of the more popular Silent Hill games, Silent Hill 3, revolving around Heather Mason and her search for her father. 

The official synopsis of the film reads: "For years, Heather Mason and her father have been on the run, always one step ahead of dangerous forces that she doesn't fully understand. Now on the eve of her 18th birthday, plagued by terrifying nightmares and the disappearance of her father, Heather discovers she's not who she thinks she is. The revelation leads her deeper into a demonic world that threatens to trap her in Silent Hill forever." 

Also, this Silent Hill film looks to take advantage of the 3D craze, and inject a little more stereoscopic into your life (as if you needed anymore).

Read More | Kotaku via Hell Descent


Verizon FIOS TV adds 3D movies on demand

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: HDTV, Home Entertainment, Movies

step up 3d fiosIf you're a Verizon FiOS TV customer, you'll be getting access to 3D movies on demand starting next month. Starting on November 16th with the premiere of Cats & Dogs: Revenge of Kitty Galore, you'll have eight 3D movies to watch in November:

  • Chicken Little
  • Bolt
  • Meet the Robinsons
  • Journey to the Center of the Earth
  • Under the Sea
  • Deep Sea
  • NASCAR

Then, December bring two more to the lineup with A Christmas Carol and Step Up 3D. Of course, in addition to having an HD set top box, you'll also need a 3D-compatible television and glasses to take part in the festivities.


3D video and gaming hazardous to your health

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Displays, HDTV, Movies

3D HDTV health hazard

When announced the 3DS, they made sure to make the press aware that children should have the 3D effect disabled if they were going to use the handheld console. Manufacturers of 3D HDTV sets have also included warnings that stated that there is a possible health risk to certain viewers, and have provided guidance that children should be limited in their 3D exposure. Year ago, Sega was going to release a 3D virtual reality headset that was quickly and quietly shelved, despite being seen as the future of gaming 15 years ago. Now news has come out that all of these warnings are based on years of research cover ups, and the details are finally being brought out now that 3D entertainment is much more readily available than it was in years past.

In a nutshell, the problem is that children under 7 are still developing their vision, and the 3D effect actually forces you into strabismus, essentially giving yourself temporary lazy eye. Since children are still developing, you run a severe risk of having them end up with permanent strabismus (or, lazy eye.) This is the reason that so many manufacturers want to be overly cautious with the use of 3D as it pertains to children, and it’s also a good reason for parents to sit up and take notice as well. Now that 3D HDTVs are on the market, we’ve gone from having super rare opportunity to view 3D content, to a bunch of animated movies incorporating it (so, 2-6 hours per month, depending on how often you go to those,) to potentially having 3D on in your home on a constant basis.

A lot of higher-ups within the consumer electronics industry point to the fact that the data is 15 years old, and that they may be new factors since the technology has advanced. However, the fact remains that all content that shows a different image to each eye (which is all 3D) forces you into strabismus. More research is needed to find out if 3D HDTV is safe for children, as well as adults, especially for prolonged lengths of time.

Read More | Audioholics

3D Movie Screenings to Include Interactive Game

Posted by Sheila Franklin Categories: Movies, Video Games

Starship O2

Lucky UK moviegoers will get to play a 3D game this summer, in addition to enjoying movies like Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs 3D and Toy Story 3 3D at participating VUE cinemas. O2’s Asteroid Storm allows audience members to guide the Starship O2 through an asteroid belt by raising their hands. Cameras mounted on the ceiling use IR scanners to track hand movements. While it seems like a silly concept, if those around you do it, then we guess you wouldn’t look any more foolish than they do.

 

Read More | Register Hardware

Advertisement