On Gear Live: How to set up Handoff in OS X Yosemite & iOS 8

'The Walking Dead' Season 3

"As we were crafting this season, we realized that there was a lot to do with Rick and Carl after that event, so the moment kept moving closer to the beginning of the season until it was in Episode 4. This is the kind of episode that most people would save for the finale, but to have it so early in the season, it's like, 'What comes next?!' It really gives this season a pretty intense drive. It was really jarring, which I think is pretty cool."

- Robert Kirkman, co-creator and executive producer of The Walking Dead

Be sure to check out our other notable quotes!

[Artwork: The Walking Dead]

Read More | TV Guide

Advertisement

The Walking Dead Season 3

Of all the great horror icons - Frankenstein's monster, vampires, mummies and Black Lagoon creatures - my favorites are zombies.

I was a kid when I discovered that comics were forbidden to use the word "zombie" if they wanted the Comics Code Authority's Seal of Approval (so Marvel revived an old Robert E. Howard word "Zuvembie" as a workaround). So it should be no surprise that I’ve loved me some Walking Dead ever since the first comic appeared on the stands. I’m a sucker for horror comics and it hit me at just the right time. Also, Kirkman was telling his horrific story in a very intriguing way - bad stuff was happening, characters you liked were going to die, and it was hard to peg just where it was all going.

(Spoilers after the jump!)


The Walking Dead Season 3

Oh Walking Dead, you make this so difficult! That’s because it’s hard to write about The Walking Dead without giving anything away.

Season 3 just debuted on AMC and so much happened that's gasp-worthy and intriguing in a "What's next?" kinda way that to write it out is to spoil it for anyone who DVR'd it. Sure, a bunch of zombies get killed, things aren’t quite what they seem, and Carl’s getting pretty handy with a gun and hand-to-hand zombie-fighting is pretty intense (I could probably do it if I had to, but I'd almost certainly be bad at it).


Latest Gear Live Videos

Reed Gunther #2One of the great things I love about going to Comic Con International in San Diego is taking a stroll through the small press section, Artist’s Alley and the Image set-up. I never know what I’ll find, but I always find something interesting that nearly makes the whole convention worthwhile.

In 2011, it was Ian Churchill’s Marineman.

This year, it was Reed Gunther by Shane and Chris Houghton.

I’ve forgotten which one of the creators I met at the Image Comics booth (got to start writing these things down), but he hand-sold me a copy of Reed Gunther #2, one of the older issues.

This is a terrific comic book. The story is touted for all ages, and it truly is. I can easily see this being enjoyed by a 9-year-old and a 39-year-old - it’s just great fun with terrific storytelling chops on display by both writer and artist.


Spider-Man MovieThis is the week where the comics industry slows down for a couple of days as everyone saves their big news for Comic Con International in San Diego. That gets going on Wednesday evening - Preview Night - and you can expect the announcements to start flying faster than anyone can cut and paste a press release, and everyone's abuzz with their favorite version of the four Spider-Man movies.

For now, though, the internets still have some things to read:

A weather-battered Beau Smith looks at Spider-Man.

Longbox Graveyard also has a look at Spider-Man, of the Steve Ditko era.

Hero Complex reports the return of Marc Silvestri’s Cyberforce, with the words “Kickstarter” and “free” as part of the launch equation.


Fatale

“[I'm] beginning a shift from work-for-hire to books I own, instead. I hit a point with the work-for-hire stuff where I was starting to feel burned out on it. Like my tank is nearing empty on superhero comics, basically. It's been a great job, and I think I found ways to bring my voice to it, but I have a lot of other things I want to do as a writer, too, so I'm going to try that for a while instead.”

- Ed Brubaker in an interview with Tom Spurgeon

And check out our other notable quotes.

Read More | The Comics Reporter

Luther StrodeWelcome, weekend warriors! The internets have released a bounty of digital delights, so let's check 'em out!

John Rogers (Leverage) talks about his role in Mark Waid’s digital comics venture, and also talks about digital comics in general. John's a very smart guy, so he's well worth listening to.

One of my favorites, SF author Jay Lake (Rocket Science; Mainspring), is profiled in the Sunday Oregonian.

Over at John Scalzi’s Whatever, author Justin Jordan writes about the trade collection of his Image comic, The Strange Talent of Luther Strode, inspired by those Charles Atlas ads in old comics. After reading about it, it’s now something I need to get.

Heidi nails what’s going on over at Disney, with link to Nikki Finke.

David Brothers nails Before Watchmen. I love the phrase “ethical rot.”


Walking Dead Book OneWhat a weird, weird funnybook week. Let’s take a look:

Artist Tony Moore is suing writer Robert Kirkman over his portion of money from The Walking Dead.

Gary Friedrich is getting legally crapped on by Marvel Comics.

DC Comics is still legally battling over Superman.

Columbia Pictures drops The Boys from their film roster.

Vietnam is banning comic books.

And how was the rest of the week?

If you've ever thought about opening a used bookstore, here are 25 Things you might discover.


Before Watchmen: Silk SpectreWatchmen! Shazam! Archie! Oh my goodness! Could a weirder week get any weirder? Oh, it can. It’s only February.

Here’s a few things to read until the Super Bowl fever hits you and, oh, wait. No one reading this cares about sports!

Well, of course DC was going to do Watchmen prequels and create more Watchmen-related graphic novels. The series will never be considered out-of-print (and now with online availability, you can get it digitally 24/7/365 so it will truly be “in print” in perpetuity). Since it’s a thing that can’t be stopped, I wish the creators well and I wish the original creators well as well (and hope they’re being compensated for the reuse of their creations). Forbes, the journal of the 1% weighs in with the “It can’t be wrong if everyone’s doing it” argument. Although Before Watchmen has to be one of the least grabby titles in modern comics history.

Michael Cavna at Comic Riffs, the Washington Post blog, collects various opinions on the coming new era of Watchmen prequels.

Here’s the Daily Beast on the behind-the-scenes soap opera at Archie. Once you realize that this is all about controlling the privately-held company, it starts to fall into place.


MarinemanEvery year when I go to Comic Con International in San Diego, I always find something unexpected, interesting and surprising in the world of comics.

This year, 2011, was no exception.

Of all the things I picked up at the various booths, there was one that really stood out for me and I stumbled across it by accident while lurking around the Image Comics area.

Marineman: A Matter Of Life And Depth by Ian Churchill (Cable, Deadpool, The Coven).

Churchill had a spot to himself and was selling trades, individual issues, and sketches.

He’s a charming, affable guy who genuinely believes in his story and his work.

He handsold me on the trade - I’d only heard of the in passing and yet I gladly handed over the $15 to get a copy.


Advertisement