On Unboxing: Unboxing Live 135: Samsung Galaxy Note 3

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Goophone i5S Clones iPhone 5


Ever heard of the new Goophone i5S? Well, it looks awfully like the iPhone 5, yet it runs Android and costs $149.99. Shameless? Nah, this is the only natural way to do a smartphone nowadays. Hopefully you have your sarcasm meter set to "On." Of course the Goophone doesn't doesn't run iOS natively. It's in fact Android but with an iOS skin. A welled deserved cease and desist is in order in 3…2…1.

Click to continue reading Goophone i5S lavishly clones Apple’s iPhone 5

Read More | Android Sale

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Samsung Galaxy S 4

Samsung made the Galaxy S 4 official at an event held at Radio City Music Hall. Led by JK Shin, head of Samsung mobile, the company showed off its new flagship smartphone--and it's exactly what we've already seen in the multiple leaks.

Front and center on the Galaxy S 4 is the 5-inch Super AMOLED 1080p display, using the new Corning Gorilla Glass 3 and sporting a whopping 441 pixels per inch. Stunning, to be sure. Additionally, this smartphone is the first to sport 802.11ac Wi-Fi support, the fastest you'll be able to find in any home at this point--also compatible with 802.11a/b/g/n as well, alongside Bluetooth 4.0. An IR blaster is included, similar to the one found on the HTC One, and you also get a removable 2,600 mAh battery. Other important specs include 2 GB of RAM, and the choice between 16, 32, and 64 GB of built-in storage. Naturally, the phone supports LTE.

Click to continue reading Samsung Galaxy S 4: 5-inch 1080p display, 802.11ac, and much more

Read More | Galaxy S 4

Samsung Galaxy S IV

Samsung will be formally announcing and unveiling the Galaxy S IV later tonight, the follow-up to the massively popular Galaxy S III. As has pretty much become typical in the consumer electronics world, we are seeing info leaking all over the place. We already got teasers of the Galaxy S IV from Samsung, but here you can see the device in full view. We've got a couple more pictures after the break as well. Excited? Here are the specs:

  • 1080p 4.99-inch screen
  • 1.8GHz 8-core chip
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 16 GB storage
  • MicroSD slot
  • 2600mAh battery
  • 7.7mm thick
  • 138 grams

Also expect eye-tracking technology that will do things like scroll content for you automatically, and pause video if you happen to look away.

Click to continue reading Samsung Galaxy S IV images leak ahead of announcement


Samsung Galaxy S IV teaser

As we know, Samsung is set to announce the Galaxy S IV on March 14. Today, the company released a teaser image of what is sure to be its next big success. Above, you see an outline and just a bit of the Samsung Galaxy S IV. Of course, we'll get the whole reveal this Thursday.

Read More | Samsung Twitter

Google Glass launch

After Google released it's latest video highlighting Project Glass, many were left salivating for when they'd be able to buy a pair of their own. Google launched the #IfIHadGlass contest to allow a number of people the ability to be the first purchasers of the "Explorer" edition of the ambitious headset, but even though the price there is $1500, you need to be one of a selected few. Today, The Verge got info direct from Google that it hopes to get Google Glass on the market for all consumers to by before the end of 2013. The price? "Less than $1,500." Pretty vague, but we are still a full 10 months away from the end of the year, and there's still much work to be done.

What price are you hoping to see Google Glass launch at? Any predictions?

Read More | The Verge

Google Chromebook Pixel

Today Google announced the Chromebook Pixel, an often-leaked touchscreen notebook computer that runs Chrome OS and is optimized for web browsing and cloud storage. The problem is that there is nothing that really sets the Chromebook Pixel apart from just about any other notebook computer to make it a compelling buy. In fact, it looks like a pretty stupid buy.

PRICE
Let's talk about the price of the Pixel for a moment. You can buy a fantastic Windows 8 PC or MacBook Air for the same price, both of which would blow away the Pixel in terms of usability. The Chromebook requires you to be connected to the Internet to be useful in any way, since it relies on cloud-based apps. A Mac or PC allows you to actually install apps on them, which you can launch when you are away from Wi-Fi, and get work done in.

Click to continue reading 3 reasons why you shouldn’t buy Google’s Chromebook Pixel


Google Chromebook Pixel

Today Google announced the Chromebook Pixel, a touchscreen notebook that seems to be Google's most confusing product offering. What's so weird about the Chromebook Pixel? We'll get to that shortly--first, let's go through a rundown of the specs.

Google is touting the Chromebook Pixel as the perfect notebook computer for anyone who spends the majority of their computing time in the browser and using cloud services. It's got a 12.85-inch display with a 3x2 aspect ratio, offering 18% more vertical space than a 16x9 display offers. Google is proud of this display, what with its 2,560 x 1,700 pixel resolution with 239 ppi density and 400nit brightness. Oh, and it's also a touchscreen, so you can interact with it directly with your fingertips.

Click to continue reading Google Chromebook Pixel: 1.8GHz, 2560 x 1700 touchscreen display, $1,299


Google Glass explorer edition ifihadglass

Google wants early adopters to usher in the future of Google Glass. You know, those high tech Internet-connected glasses? The company is offering the opportunity for anyone to join in. A new competition outlined today by Google will give a lucky few the opportunity to have Google's Project Glass Explorer Edition before everyone else. That's a "neener neener" you can't pay for. Er, actually, you still have to pay for it. It'll cost $1500 if you win the priviledge of early access.

Google posted on its Glass site that it is looking for "bold, creative individuals who want to join us and be a part of shaping the future of Glass." In order to apply you need to use Google+ or Twitter to tell Google what you would do if you had glass, using the hashtag #ifihadglass.

Here are the details straight from Google:

Click to continue reading Google holds Glass Explorer Edition competition, offers early access

Read More | Google

HTC One review

HTC has announced it's newest flagship smartphone--the HTC One. What makes the HTC One stand out among the rest? It's got a great design aesthetic and the specs to match. The One packs a 4.7-inch LCD display (bonded to the Gorilla Glass 2 enclosure) with 1080p resolution. That's an impressive 468ppi.

The HTC One also boasts an impressive camera that ditches the megapixel game in order to focus on vastly-improved low-light capabilities instead. The result is a 4-megapixel rear camera that HTC's marketing department has renamed UltraPixels, which each capturing 300% more light than a typical 8-megapixel shooter. It's a bold move, and it's in line with what Nokia's Lumia 920 PureView camera is all about. The One also has optical image stabilization (OIS) for both the rear and front cameras. Speaking of the front camera, it's also an ultra-wide angle camera, similar to what HTC packed into the Windows Phone 8X.

Click to continue reading HTC One: 4.7-inch, 1080p, UltraPixel camera, LTE launching in March


Samsung Galaxy S IV leak

Word on the street is that Samsung will unveil the Galaxy S IV on March 14th. The Galaxy S line is Samsung's flagship, and is going to be a big deal as the next flagship device from one of the two companies that are dominating the mobile phone hardware landscape. The Galaxy S IV will not only go head-to-head with the iPhone 5, but also the upcoming HTC One as well. Rumored Galaxy S IV specs include:

  • 4.99" Super AMOLED 1080p display
  • Exynos 5 Octa chipset with 8-core processor
  • 8-core Mali-T678 GPU
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 13-megapixel rear camera with 1080p video recording
  • 2-megapixel front-facing camera

Of course, we'll have all the news as it happens in just under a month. In the meantime, peep the purported leak of the design of the device up top.

Read More | The Verge

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