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iPhoneFor those who were waiting with baited breath for the launch of Mac OS X Leopard at the Worldwide Developer’s Conference in June, you are going to have to wait a bit longer. just dropped a bombshell, claiming that, despite their promise that they would ship Leopard this spring, we won’t be seeing it on Apple Store shelves until October 2007. The reason for the delay? One word: . From Apple:

iPhone contains the most sophisticated software ever shipped on a mobile device, and finishing it on time has not come without a price—we had to borrow some key software engineering and QA resources from our Mac OS® X team, and as a result we will not be able to release Leopard at our Worldwide Developers Conference in early June as planned. While Leopard’s features will be complete by then, we cannot deliver the quality release that we and our customers expect from us. We now plan to show our developers a near final version of Leopard at the conference, give them a beta copy to take home so they can do their final testing, and ship Leopard in October. We think it will be well worth the wait. Life often presents tradeoffs, and in this case we’re sure we’ve made the right ones.

Whoa. Think about that for a moment. Apple claims that the software on the iPhone, which is supposedly a stripped down and optimized OS X, is so sophisticated that they had to move resources from the Mac OS X team to the iPhone team to get iPhone out the door in June. Developers who attend WWDC will instead walk away with a beta version of Leopard.

If that isn’t enough proof that Apple sees the iPhone as their main focus right now, we don’t know what else they could do to convince you of that fact. Still, we guess that, on the positive side, the fact that Apple is delaying the OS as opposed to releasing an under-performing version of it’s next-gen OS only to patch it up in a few months, is a good thing.

Read More | Apple Hot News

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Mac Pro

A few days ago, Apple announced that the Mac Pro would now become available with dual Quad-Core Intel Xeon Clovertown processors, each running at 3.0 GHz. We have received reports from readers who ordered the octo-core Macs that they have received shipping notifications. So why aren’t we more excited? Well, the price difference between the 3.0 GHz quad-core Mac Pro and the 3.0 GHz 8-core Mac Pro is $700. However, move that $700 elsewhere, say, to extra RAM, and you walk away with a quad-core Mac with 4-6GB of RAM. To us, that is just a much better deal all around - you know, what with there being a severe lack of programs that can take advantage of four cores, let alone eight.

Read More | Apple Mac Pro Product Page

i.Sound iPod Case Spring is here, summer is coming, which means we’ll be spending way more time away from our computers

outdoors. What better way to enjoy picnics, strolls through the park, or a day at the beach than with your favorite MP3s? Instead of lugging portable speakers, consider Dreamgear’s i.Sound Audio Vault, an ingenious iPod case that doubles as a speaker. If used to house a 5G iPod, the other side of the case allows you to watch videos and access the controls—all without opening the case. The i.Sound is made of strong nylon material, has bass boost and even an alarm function. Requires 4 AA batteries. Dreamgear states the Audio Vault is compatible with all iPods, but frankly, we think it’s way too big for an iPod Shuffle or Nano. The Audio Vault is unavailable for purchase on Dreamgear’s website, however you can grab it for $27 USD at Target.

Read More | Dreamgear via ChipChick


iPodToday Apple announced that the 100 millionth iPod has been sold, making the product the fastest selling PMP in history. The first one was purchased in 2001. Since that time, more than 10 new models have been introduced, allowing music aficionados to become portably tuned in and turned on.

“At this historic milestone, we want to thank music lovers everywhere for making iPod such an incredible success,” said Steve Jobs. “iPod has helped millions of people around the world rekindle their passion for music, and we’re thrilled to be a part of that.”

Read More | Apple

PodolockUnfortunately, because of its high price and coolness factor, iPods are targets for theft. And the compact size of the Shuffle makes it especially vulnerable. A solution? The Podolock is an acrylic case you slide your Shuffle into (you can still access all the controls). Insert the supplied durable-strength cable through the case, attach to clothing, objects or even a keychain, and you’ve instantly secured your precious iPod. It’s certainly a step up from simply clipping the Shuffle to your jeans. Available for $20 USD.

Read More | Podolock

iGolf

We always like presenting our readers the latest in iPod accessories. The iGolf has to be the most definitive of our collection. Developed in Spain, the team of Apple and Volkswagen created this vehicle that will set you back about $12,000.00. Place your beloved 8GB nano into the armrest dock to send your tunes directly into the automobile’s sound system. No news yet as to when it will arrive stateside. We have to admit, even if we can’t afford the car, we surely enjoyed playing on their website.

Read More | Nuevo iGolf (Spanish) via Stuff.tv


Google just launched the beta version of Google Desktop for Mac, and we have spent a bit of time getting aquatinted with the new Spotlight competitor. We have put together a full Google Desktop for Mac gallery walkthrough if you just want the visuals, but for those who want our full impressions, read on.

Installing Google Desktop for Mac took a bit more than the standard drag-and-drop affair that most Mac programs boast. Obviously, this is because Google Desktop does a lot of it’s work in the background, under the hood. The good thing, though, is that while you wait, you are able to set various preferences for how Google Desktop will operate on your machine.

Click to continue reading Google Desktop for Mac Impressions


Belkin In-Desk DockWe’re endlessly fascinated by the growing—and often wacky—universe of iPod-related products. From iPod cases that reflect to a belt buckle that houses your Nano, to a bed that’s really a giant iPod dock, the possibilities seem endless. Now, from Belkin comes the In-Desk Dock, designed to fits in those 3” wide circular holes in your desk often used for wiring (or, Belkin suggests you can make your own hole using 3-inch hole saw, a move guaranteed to land you in HR if you try this at work). Once installed, the In-Desk Dock allows you to easily charge and play your iPod once synced to your computer, and also includes a stereo-output jack for speakers or headphones—all while saving precious desk space. A 5G iPod is shown in the photo, however we do not know if it holds other kinds of iPods. Coming soon for $40 USD.

Read More | Belkin

Our bad! When we put up our Apple TV Unboxing Gallery, maybe you would have appreciated it if we actually let you know it was there. So, here we are to redeem ourselves, with what we think is a not-too-shabby look at the Apple TV unboxing experience. If you are curious about what comes in the box (not much, really) as well as what is lacking (video cables?), you may find our gallery of some use to yourself. Once again Apple has done a fantastic job of making a device possibly feel more special than it is simply by the way they packaged it—although, with their failure to pack in any sort of video cable, be it digital or analog, they managed to also make you feel like something is missing at the same time. See for yourself in our Apple TV unboxing gallery.

Read More | Apple TV Unboxing Gallery via Unboxing


Coldplay ParachutesIn a very brave move, EMI yesterday decided to sell its music on iTunes without copy protection. The over 150,000 tunes can be then played on many musical devices and/or burned to CD. Beginning this May, the tracks, from such artists as Coldplay and Nora Jones, will be available for $1.29, as opposed to the $.99 price for regular iTunes. Purchase an entire downloaded album for the same price as a standard one.

After the Napster hullabaloo, most songs sold online now contain copy protection software. Apple’s Steve Jobs is hoping that other record labels will follow this lead and is counting on 2.5 million total tunes by the end of this year.

Read More | USA Today

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