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OS X Leopard

We have had quite a few people send this in to us this afternoon, hoping that it was a screenshot of OS X Leopard. Nice try, but this is just a skinned version of Tiger. Still, there are some subtle changes in the screenshot that we like - namely, the orange and white iSync logo and the “burnt aqua” GUI, signaling an even further (or complete) departure from brushed metal. The subtle Finder changes are fine as well, but with Spotlight, we see direct Finder usage continually dropping. In the meantime, if you want to make your Mac look similar, go ahead and use the UNO Gui, linked below.


Read More | UNO Gui via Flickr


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Last week we told you about the possibility of VMware releasing GSX into the wild for free.  Well folks, it has arrived!  You can grab your copy of VMware Server Beta here

Start experiencing the benefits of server virtualization
VMware Server is a robust yet easy to use product for users new to server virtualization technology. VMware Server enables companies to partition a physical server into multiple virtual machines, and to start experiencing the benefits of virtualization.


If you have worked in an enterprise environment, have probably heard about this company called VMware.  For those of you new to VMware, these guys make a product that allows you to run multiple servers from ONE box, all done virtually.  It’s what’s referred to as “virtualization” and is the ultimate in geekdom for an enterprise.  More importantly, it can really make an administrators life a lot easier if implemented correctly, and save the company a boat load. 

Cnet has published an article referencing a rumor that VMware will be releasing one of their core products into the wild for FREE next week.  This is HUGE news.  The idea behind this is that since VMware is now seeing some stiff competition heading their way, they are going to cut it off at the pass by using the “crack head” effect.  In short, hook on a free sample, and sell them on the big products.  Sounds like a logical enough plan.  If this pans out to be true, we could be in for some interesting times in the IT world.  The only missing link in VMware’s product line is being able to run OS X, if they can accomplish that, their stock is going to skyrocket.


AzureusImagine my horror when I went to boot up Azureus on my iMac Core Duo a little while ago, only to watch the icon quickly appear and then disappear, mocking me in the process. After a bit of snooping, turns out that Azureus flat out won’t work on a Core Duo Mac. Determined to find something, I did a bit of sleuthing, which eventually led me to find a patched version that works perfectly. In fact, it seems to work a bit faster than Azureus on the G5. I know, many a Mac user sides with Tomato Torrent when it comes to bittorrenting on OS X, but if you are an avid Azureus user with a Core Duo Mac, grab the patched version at the link below.


Read More | Patched Azureus for Intel Macs


DescriptionWe would hate for our readers to be unprepared for a virus attack that is scheduled to begin on February 3rd.  Be wary of strange emails, as Win32/Mywife.E@mm is on its way - malware that is sure to send everyone in your address book an nice infection as well.  Make sure you are running the latest version of your antivirus software.  Reports say the man behind the virus is too busy to stop the attack because of his many scheduled divorce hearings.  Oh, Mac users can disregard this message as usual.


Read More | Microsoft Security Advisory


I know there are a lot of Mac users reading the blog, so for those of you (like me), who use Adobe apps as part of your daily workflow, you may want to read this.  The following is from an Adobe employee blog written by John Knack.

We’ve posted an FAQ concerning Adobe’s plans to ship Intel-native (Universal) Mac applications. Highlights:

Yes, we are working on Universal versions of our tools. The FAQ includes a list of those being converted.
No, we don’t plan to update CS2/Studio 8 to be Universal. That means native support will come in a future version, which is some time off. (The FAQ cites an 18-24 month historical cycle for product updates. CS2 shipped in April 2005, Studio 8 in September.)
Yes, most of today’s applications will run in Rosetta (the emulation layer for PowerPC code running on Intel), though that’s not a configuration Adobe has tested extensively. The Version Cue server component won’t run on Rosetta.

The Lightroom beta, made available first on Mac, will be available in Universal form very soon.
It’s important to make a few things clear: We’re working really hard, together with Apple, to make this conversion. Apple staff are on site at Adobe every day and have been for quite some time, helping our teams make the required move to the Xcode development environment & taking our feedback on how to make Xcode support large projects like Photoshop.

Everyone—Mac users, Adobe, and Apple—wants to get Adobe apps running natively on Mactel as soon as possible, but doing so while maintaining their quality will take time. If we knew how to do this more quickly, we would do it.

I’d like to make one other point: in the first 18 months that Mac OS X was in the market (starting with the shipment of 10.0.0), Adobe released (by my recollection) 13 OS X-native applications. That averages out to better than one release every six weeks for a year and a half. Name another company that showed up for the game on that scale. Please bear that history in mind the next time someone on a user forum starts raising doubts about Adobe’s commitment to the Mac.

So the short of it is, if you are working as a professional designer or anyone who uses Adobe’s apps fairly frequently, make sure you know what you are getting into when buying that new Mactel.  I for one am looking forward to a new MacBook Pro soon - real soon - but I absolutely must have Adobe’s apps work on my machine from day one.  I hope they pound this out pronto.


Read More | John Knack Blog


IE7 Beta 2With Firefox running rampant over what used to be Microsoft’s hallowed ground - the Internet browser, the boys (and girls) at Redmond are trying to play catch-up.  Today they released the newest public beta of Internet Explorer 7.0, dubbed “beta 2” (imagine that).  Internet Explorer 7 promises to deliver increased security through protection against phishing and malware, tabbed browsing for easier navigation, RSS capability, improved CSS (cascading style sheets) support, and tools for deploying/managing IE7 in enterprise environments.  Microsoft had taken a hiatus with the release of IE6, and had stated that there would be no new releases of Internet Explorer until Vista shipped.  With Firefox rapidly eating away at their market share, Microsoft had little choice but to accelerate their browser development time frame.  So, if you’re a loyal IE user, or just curious, get your groove on by downloading the latest beta, but keep in mind that it’s only compatible with Windows XP running SP2.


Read More | Microsoft via IEBlog (MSDN)


Destination FloorWe’ve all been there at some point in our lives.  Usually it happens when you need it the most - a job interview, doctor’s appointment, a date, etc.  Crowded elevators suck royally.  Destination Floor Guidance System is trying to end our crowded, slow elevator woes by intelligently grouping people together.  People going to the same floors will likely be in same elevator due to smart kiosks located where the passengers board.  The elevators will better serve the building after some time, since the kiosks use historical data to their advantage by strategically stationing elevators near certain floors at their peak times.  The elevator is already in use at the Metropolitan Park West Tower in downtown Seattle and is planned to debut in New York at the new New York Times Building next.  While this is a real innovation in helping high-traffic buildings, I hope that we start shooting into pressurized tunnels in the near future.


Read More | The Enquirer via Gizmodo


My Favorite Sites on Reveal

Reveal is a Firefox extension that allows you to view your current tabs as thumbnails directly on your screen - as shown with my favorite websites above. So I thought that this might prove pretty useless to me considering that I’m already using tabbed browsing.  Why would I need to have mini pictures of these and what purpose would they serve?  What’s really great about this extension is the ease of use.  Once installed, you just press F2 to bring up the interface.  Not only is it that simple, but its pretty too.  Your screenshot comes zooming in from the side of your screen and places itself in the middle of your screen with the current tab highlighted.

Click to continue reading Reveal Firefox Extension Reviewed


Steve Jobs and the gang are busily working on the next build of 10.4, but that’s not stopping them from advertising the fact they need some help with the next version of Finder.  That is, the one for OS X 10.5, or Leopard.  This ad was published on Apple’s site:

- Participate in all of the various stages of feature development from design brainstorms, through feature development, all the way to fixing that last critical elusive bug under a tight release deadline.
- You will be required to produce clear designs, excellent implementation and tight code.
- Deliver tight, well implemented features, fix bugs and develop Finder into the best file browser on the planet.
- Work on performance and responsiveness of the Finder, making it feel lightweight, fast, snappy and pleasant to use.

Mac Rumors tell us that one of the things that have been said about 10.5 is “extensive use of Spotlight alongside an improved user interface and performance improvement.”  My application was just rejected because they said I was a “fanboy.”


Read More | Apple via Mac Rumors


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