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Laser HDTVMitsubishi has announced that there is a new breed of HDTVs on the way.  These new DLP displays use red, blue, and red

green lasers to create deep, bright images on super thin screens.  The laser-based HDTV is expected to have a very small footprint, and should be incredibly lightweight.  By using lasers rather than a lamp in these sets, a wider range of intensity in color can be achieved.  Even better, these units should consume one third of the power of a conventional HDTV.  Lastly, the lasers are expected to last the lifetime of the TV (rather than burning out like DLP lamps.) Exptected to hit retail late next year, we should at least have more information on the prototype later this week.


Read More | New York Times


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BioPay

Newly released research by Sanford Bernstein analyst Emme Kozloff, found that by using “electronic wallets” companies like Wal-Mart could save big.  By using customer’s fingerprints as a payment method, companies could speed up the checkout process; reduce the potential for fraud and identity theft, and most importantly save money by lowering the transaction fee.  This type of system is already in use by Albertsons, Cub Foods, and Piggly Wiggly.  While this might save time at the checkout, privacy advocates are still very concerned about the process. 


Read More | CNN


So, let’s be honest - we have all heard of RFID technology by now. To further your education, Spychips is a site dedicated to informing the masses against the possible dangers that exist with this new technology.  RFID has infiltrated everyday life, unbeknownst to most. Stores like Wal-Mart use RFID for things like inventory management, and as an anti-theft device.  Some of the things that Spychips.com reports on are a bit one sided, but its interesting to see how this technology could be potentially damaging to our privacy.  If you do not look out for your civil liberties, and privacy, no one else will.


Read More | SpyChips


Life imitating sci-fi:  University of Texas at Dallas nanotechnologists have created super strong artificial muscles, capable of superhuman feats. 

University of Texas at Dallas nanotechnologists have made alcohol- and hydrogen-powered artificial muscles that are 100 times stronger than natural muscles, able to do 100 times greater work per cycle and produce, at reduced strengths, larger contractions than natural muscles.

The buff synthetic muscles could be used in many situations, including autonomous robotics.  The muscles, like real muscles, convert chemical fuel to mechanical energy, getting rid of the need for batteries or wired power.


Read More | Physics Org


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