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Turkey DinnerWorried about pigging out during the holidays? Ukrainian Dr. Hryhory Chausovsky of the Zaporizhia University Life Activities Laboratory has created the Talking Plate, which lets you know if it is overfilled. The plate measures 15 cm in diameter and is connected to a palm-size computer. Its integrated weigh sensors judge how much food is on the plate, and then issues nagging phrases such as, “Where’s your willpower?”

Although the plate is not yet available to the general public, Dr. Chausovsky has also invented other dining aids, such as a belt that issues a tone when you eat too much and a plate that plays music each time your fork hits the plate. “If the utensil strikes are too rapid, the plate will play fast and aggressive music while if the person eats more slowly, the music will be calmer and less stressful,” Chausovsky said.

We think we will stick to our usual over-feasting and just not look at the scales until 2007.

Read More | iol

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  K7 KLOK

Russia meets America as industrial designer Mike Mayberry of KLOK Modern has created a K7 KLOK Kit which is sure to attract gadget freaks of all ages. Made from half century-old Nixie Tubes that he found stashed in Russian warehouses, the 136 mm x 63 mm x 65 mm clock features 10 layers of glowing orange electrodes embedded on an aluminum housing made in the U.S. Offered as a limited edition for $105.00, check out the demo then preorder your KLOK for its January re-release.

Read More | KLOK

Lego Mindstorm NXT

Lego has joined the bot revolution. The MindStorms NXT has 3x servo motors, touch, light, and sound sensors, and Bluetooth capability. It features a 100 x 64 pixel LCD, a USB full speed port, a 32-bit microprocessor, and an 8 kHz sound channel with with 8-bit resolution and 2-16 KHz sample rate. Imagine the glee from your kids when they get their own bot to feed their pet, guard their room, or pick up their dirty clothes. Imagine your own glee dishing out $249.00 to Lego and getting to put the MindStorms together.

 

Read More | Lego

LG ebookLG Electronics has revealed its concept for the future with their “ebook.” The laptop uses OLED (organic light-emitting diodes) rather than LCD panels which are similar to those used in their Chocolate phone. The ebook also features a transparent cylindrical hinge for storing clean fuels such as methyl alcohol.

“Under the current technology, it’s extremely expensive to build such a laptop. But it’s possible,” said Na Joo-young, public relations official of LG. “We are suggesting the idea for the laptop of the next generation.”

More energy efficient than current laptops, the ebook recently received a very prestigious Red Dot Award, allowing LG a chance to gloat. We think that they deserve the praise and hope they turn their design into a reality soon.

Read More | Korean Times

IntellicotWe dig telling you about the latest gadgets for adults, and even occasionally dabble in those for kids, but this one takes babysitting to a whole ‘nother level. It was bad enough when diaper companies discovered the means that would allow you not to have to change your baby for hours at a time.  The Cencio Intellicot makes it possible for you not to have to attend the little nippers for even longer. The gadget rocks your baby, has a video camera for surveillance, a built-in lift system, and circulates air. It even has a convenient window for your tot to watch you watching her/him. Called a “labour of love” by Britain’s Coventry University, we call it a glorified ant farm and a terrible replacement for a couple of hugs and a good old-fashioned rocking chair.

Read More | Intellicot

Digestive tableArtist Amy Youngs has created a digestive table that recycles your uneaten food with an ecosystem that consists of worms, sowbugs, and bacteria. Simply toss your scraps into the top portal and the critters below start breaking it down into compost. You then feed it to your plants to complete the cycle. You can even watch them working on an infrared security camera (because worms are sensitive to white light) connected to an LCD screen built into the table. While we applaud Ms. Youngs’ idea, she may have to deal with our dog Spot, who believes that he gets first crack at the leftovers.

Read More | Amy Youngs

Aristo botThe Washington University Aristo bot can wirelessly navigate through a fire, clone itself by creating a ring of software around that fire, then send the information through a PDA to let its owner know exactly where and how intense the fire is. If the fire intensifies, the agent clones again and maintains the ring.

Creators Burchan Bayazit and Nuzhet Atay claim that the robot can be used for other applications such as farmers gathering soil data over hundreds of acres of land without ever leaving home. At the rate that technology is speeding up these days, the Aristo will be able to clone a few cows while it is checking out the acreage. Check out the demo to see Aristo in action.

Read More | Space Daily

Security Bot

We have just found a Chinese security bot that can move about pre-programmed or on its own on flat surfaces and inclines up to 20º. This two-wheeled robot is best suited for airports, warehouses, residential areas, and shopping centers. It was developed by the Robot Research Institute of the Civil Aviation University of China in cooperation with the Tianjiin YAAN Technology Electronics Company. Although it may not replace your Neighborhood Alert, it least it doesn’t carry a machine gun like its Korean cousin.

 

Read More | ST Daily

IGURO

IGURO enters the market as D2E’s version of the Tmusk receptionist/porter bot. Introduced at Robo World 2006, this robot comes equipped with a built-in visual sensor on its head and voice recognition. He actually knows the difference between employees and visitors, and can be managed via remote. IGURO can tell you about information services or escort you to a specific location. We would love to witness a showdown between IGURO and the Tmusk bot in some darkened, crowded hallway.

 

Read More | Aving

VeinViewerWatch out, Superman. Luminetx has created the VeinViewer that allows health care professionals to have x-ray vision. The device works by a near-infrared light highlighting red blood cells captured by video camera, digitizing them, then displaying them below the skin, thereby aiding clinicians to find veins that might otherwise be difficult to discover.

The UT Health Science Center in Memphis originally designed it for tracking macular degeneration in the eye. Luminetx CEO Jim Phillips says that when the VeinViewer was accidentally shined across an arm, its inventors realized it had other applications. He also forsees it being used for ID purposes much like eye scans and fingerprinting.

Read More | Luminetx

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