On Gear Live: Apple iPhone 6: 4.7-inch 1334 x 750 Retina HD display, A8 processor, NFC for $199 on September 19

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Google Glass explorer edition ifihadglass

Google wants early adopters to usher in the future of Google Glass. You know, those high tech Internet-connected glasses? The company is offering the opportunity for anyone to join in. A new competition outlined today by Google will give a lucky few the opportunity to have Google's Project Glass Explorer Edition before everyone else. That's a "neener neener" you can't pay for. Er, actually, you still have to pay for it. It'll cost $1500 if you win the priviledge of early access.

Google posted on its Glass site that it is looking for "bold, creative individuals who want to join us and be a part of shaping the future of Glass." In order to apply you need to use Google+ or Twitter to tell Google what you would do if you had glass, using the hashtag #ifihadglass.

Here are the details straight from Google:

Click to continue reading Google holds Glass Explorer Edition competition, offers early access

Read More | Google

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HTC One review

HTC has announced it's newest flagship smartphone--the HTC One. What makes the HTC One stand out among the rest? It's got a great design aesthetic and the specs to match. The One packs a 4.7-inch LCD display (bonded to the Gorilla Glass 2 enclosure) with 1080p resolution. That's an impressive 468ppi.

The HTC One also boasts an impressive camera that ditches the megapixel game in order to focus on vastly-improved low-light capabilities instead. The result is a 4-megapixel rear camera that HTC's marketing department has renamed UltraPixels, which each capturing 300% more light than a typical 8-megapixel shooter. It's a bold move, and it's in line with what Nokia's Lumia 920 PureView camera is all about. The One also has optical image stabilization (OIS) for both the rear and front cameras. Speaking of the front camera, it's also an ultra-wide angle camera, similar to what HTC packed into the Windows Phone 8X.

Click to continue reading HTC One: 4.7-inch, 1080p, UltraPixel camera, LTE launching in March


Samsung Galaxy S IV leak

Word on the street is that Samsung will unveil the Galaxy S IV on March 14th. The Galaxy S line is Samsung's flagship, and is going to be a big deal as the next flagship device from one of the two companies that are dominating the mobile phone hardware landscape. The Galaxy S IV will not only go head-to-head with the iPhone 5, but also the upcoming HTC One as well. Rumored Galaxy S IV specs include:

  • 4.99" Super AMOLED 1080p display
  • Exynos 5 Octa chipset with 8-core processor
  • 8-core Mali-T678 GPU
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 13-megapixel rear camera with 1080p video recording
  • 2-megapixel front-facing camera

Of course, we'll have all the news as it happens in just under a month. In the meantime, peep the purported leak of the design of the device up top.

Read More | The Verge

OUYA pre-order

OUYA, the Android-based home game console that took Kickstarter by storm, is now available for pre-order on Amazon for those who missed out on the campaign. The cost is $99 for the unit, which includes the OUYA console and one controller. The draw of OUYA is that anyone can develop and publish games for the console, and there's no huge financial barrier to entry for devs. This could mean that there will be just a bunch of random stuff, but it also means that you'll have more developers working on quality games--and for the first time on a home console, you'll likely see games as inexpensive as the ones you play on your iOS and other Android devices. OUYA is powered by a quad-core NVIDIA Tegra 3 processor and 1 GB RAM with 8 GB of storage and 1080p output. Pre-order it now for $99 and it'll deliver in June, and don't forget to grab an extra controller.

Read More | OUYA pre-order

Nike FuelBand iOS Android app

The Nike+ FuelBand is one of the most popular fitness gadgets out there (although the verdict is still out on if fitness gadgets actually improve our health,) but there's been a complaint from Android users since it's release regarding the lack of an app for Android-powered smartphones. Despite waiting patiently for about a year, it turns out, a FuelBand app isn't even on the radar for Nike.

To deliver the best experience for all Nike+ FuelBand users, we are focusing on the FuelBand experience across iOS and nikeplus.com, where you can sync your activity, set new goals, and connect with friends. At this time, we are not working on an Android version of the mobile app.

In other words, the company is committed to having the FuelBand work perfectly within the iOS ecosystem, and doesn't have time right now to worry about the fragmented Android mess. Of course, the FuelBand doesn't require a smartphone at all, so Android users (and anyone else) can use it, they just need to sync over USB to their computer rather than over Bluetooth like you can do with an iPhone.

Read More | Giz

google aaac ruling

Six grueling years of the ACCC dragging Google in and out of Australian courtrooms and hearings for "misleading advertisements" displayed in search results have now come to an end.

Five Australian High Court judges have overturned a ruling requiring Google to set up programs that properly vet ads. The lawsuits started because of the specific claim that if one were to search Google in 2006 for "Honda Austrailia," the user would also be shown sponsored ads from competing car companies. This new ruling, however, proves that the concern of the ACCC is an outdated one.

Read More | Reuters

RIAA Google takedown requestsThanks to Google's Transparency Report, we can see just how many copyright takedown requests it gets, and who issues such requests. The RIAA tops the list with nearly 10 million takedown requests issued. The RIAA issues hundreds of thousands of notices every week in regards to piracy sites, and has topped the most recent monthly requests. This goes to show just how severe the piracy network is, or even perhaps, how futile the RIAA's attempts are at squashing it.

Read More | Google Transparency Report via Engadget


LG Optimus G review

The LG Optimus G was released a couple of months ago, and was a statement from LG that it would no longer be seen as a mid-range smartphone manufacturer. The company took its time with this one, focusing on a few key areas that it felt would set this phone apart from the wildly crowded Android smartphone pack, where Samsung has been recognized as the leader. The phone is available on both Sprint and AT&T for $199 with a two-year contract. The question is, did LG deliver? On the surface, it seems to have checked all the right boxes, what with 4G LTE, quad-core processor, Corning Gorilla Glass 2, and a 4.7-inch True HD IPS Plus display. Is it enough? Follow along with us in our full LG Optimus G review for the answer.

Click to continue reading LG Optimus G review


Samsung Galaxy Rubgy Pro

All you Samsung Galaxy Rugby Pro users on AT&T, listen up! We just got word from your carrier that the long-awaited update that'll allow you to upgrade your device to Android 4.1 Jelly Bean is now available. That means that your push-to-talk capable device will now let you use feature like Google Now, Quick Settings, and even DriveMode, which aims to prevent texting while driving. When you're ready to upgrade, just hit the link below.

Read More | Galaxy Rugby Pro Android 4.1 upgrade

Maps for Windows Phone users is about to get a little better. According to Google, it is planning on fixing the issue preventing Windows Phone users from reaching the Google Maps website through Internet Explorer. The search giant had this to say:

"We periodically test Google Maps compatibility with mobile browsers to make sure we deliver the best experience for those users. In our last test, IE mobile still did not offer a good maps experience with no ability to pan or zoom and perform basic map functionality. As a result, we chose to continue to redirect IE mobile users to Google.com where they could at least make local searches. The Firefox mobile browser did offer a somewhat better user experience and that’s why there is no redirect for those users. Recent improvements to IE mobile and Google Maps now deliver a better experience and we are currently working to remove the redirect. We will continue to test Google Maps compatibility with other mobile browsers to ensure the best possible experience for users."

Google had previously stated that the outage was because its mobile Maps site wasn't designed with IE in mind.


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