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The European Parliament overwhelmingly voted to reject a proposed law that would create a single way of patenting software across the European Union.  The final vote, 648-14 vote with 18 abstentions, came Wednesday and is the nail in the coffin for the bill, since the drafters of the law, the head office of the European Commission, say they won’t create another bill.  Many lawmakers have said they believed the measure did not promote innovation and would stifle enterprise, and also that human knowledge cannot be patented.

EICTA, a group representing 10,000 companies including giants such as Nokia and Alcatel SA which had been lobbying for the bill, said the decision to scrap it was wise, given the large number of amendments that threatened to severely narrow the scope of the legislation.  CompTIA, representing small- and medium-sized information technology companies, echoed this view. “Conflicting views have confused the issue and made it difficult for the parliament to reach a clear and balanced decision that would adequately support innovation.”

Read More | USA Today


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The European Parliment moved closer to rejecting a proposed law that would create one single way of patenting software throughout the European Union on Tuesday.  Lawmakers are expected to vote Wednesday on this software patent directive, but if they do reject it, the law will basically be “dead” since the European Commission which had drafted the law, has said that they will not put forth another.  Comanpies such as Nokia Corp. and Siemens AG are still fighting for the bill to be adopted, claiming the need to invest in research and development.

Some 178 amendments to the bill have been tabled by parliamentarians ahead of the vote—which is expected to drag for hours if it is needed—and if any is adopted the proposal would go to a process called ‘conciliation’ between the Parliament and the EU Council which could take months to complete.

Read More | Business Week


Google Click Defense Click Defense Inc., a seller of online marketing tools, have said that they have filed a lawsuit against Google Inc. because they have failed to protect those who use their advertising program from “click fraud”, costing at least $5 million.  The lawsuit, filed June 24th in San Jose, Ca, is also seeking a class action status.  A spokesman for Google has said,  “We believe the suit is without merit and we will defend ourselves against it vigorously.” The thing is, “click fraud” is not fraud at all, at least by the standards of the law. Rather, it is an industry term used to describe the deliberate clicking on Web search ads by users with no plans to do business with the advertiser. Rival companies might employ people or machines to do this because the advertiser has to pay the Web search provider for each click.

Read More | Slashdot


Apples iPod mini Notebook

According to Patent Application 20040224638, Apple may be on the path to bringing out its most unique portable computer to date. The notebook would allow for an iPod mini to double as the touch pad. The patent also talks about integrating higher RF signals into the notebook from within the cell phone range. I must say, while it looks interesting - it seems a bit “toy-ish” to me to have a pink iPod mini sitting in my silver PowerBook. Then again, who are we to judge? Nowadays everything that Apple touches turns to gold.

Read More | Macsimum News


Sendo Motorola Motorola has come to terms, agreeing to buy parts of Sendo. Motorola will end up with Sendo’s research and development team, including the equipment the team uses. We do not know the specifics of exactly how much Moto is forking out, but it looks like the Sendo brand may be done. A shame, we thought the Sendo X was pretty cool. Last year Sendo brought in $420 million - I guess the days of that being a nice income are gone.

Read More | MobileTracker


AMD Sues Intel Computer chip maker AMD filed an antitrust complaint against rival Intel on Monday. The charges, filed in Federal Court, have AMD(Advanced Micro Devices) claiming that Intel used its size to “coerce” customers into deliberately avoiding AMD’s chips.  Intel holds approximately 80% of the chip market, with AMD left with the remaining 20%.  This is just the latest in a string of smaller tech. companies suing larger ones, but lawsuits like this don’t always have a negative effect on the parties involved. The case is likely to shed light on the world of chip sales, tech analysts say. The case isn’t expected to take down Intel, but will likely end up as a positive for both companies. Lawsuits often generate valuable publicity.

Read More | USA Today


Longhorn RSS Microsoft announced Friday that its next version of the Windows operating platform would include built-in support for Internet data feeds. Even though RSS isn’t currently in widespread use, Microsoft believes that in the future this increasingly popular way to get news will become a mainstay. Of course, we reported our take on this a few minutes after the Gnomedex announcement.

In the long-delayed Windows upgrade, code-named Longhorn and expected to be released late next year, an RSS icon will appear in the Internet Explorer Web browser to make it easy for people to find, much like Apple Computer Inc. has done with its Safari browser.  Longhorn will store all data downloaded to a computer via RSS in a single place. It will maintain a central list of all of a computer user’s RSS subscriptions, from Web log entries to photos pulled from an online family picture gallery.

Read More | USA Today


Apple It seems as if Apple has something new in store, seeing as how they’re handing out invites to a special media event on July 7th.  They have not disclosed what the event will be about, or even the location of the event, but some are speculating that it maybe be the release of iTunes 4.9 with podcasting support, while others think it might be new iPods - 2nd generation shuffles, 5th generation standards, or any combination of the above.  A French newspaper even suggests that it may be to announce the new iTunes phone from Motorola.  Anyone’s guess is good right now since Apple is keeping a tight lid on the details, so we’ll just have to wait until the 7th to see what the big deal is.

Read More | engadget


Internet Explorer 7 RSS

Okay, I just snapped these pictures while sitting here at . Check this out, what you see above is Internet Explorer 7 running on a very new Longhorn build. When you visit a website that has an RSS feed, an orange and white RSS button will appear in the toolbar. If clicked, you will then be brought to the screen you see above. You can increase and/or decrease the size of each post, as well as subscribe to the feed. IE 7’s visual implementation of RSS is what I would call extremely similar to Tiger’s Safari 2.0. That being said, I am really happy about the fact that Longhorn will be featuring a central feed location. In layman’s terms, any feed subscribed to will be stored in a central location within the OS. The beauty of this is that any application can be written to access this feed with your permission. As an example, Dean Hachamovitch showed how the Longhorn screen saver displaying a slide show of images downloaded from an RSS feeds enclosures. When showing the images, there was a caption on the bottom right which consisted of the first paragraph or so of the blog post in which the images were sent in. Read more at my post on Venturus. Here is an image of the Longhorn screen saver using RSS:

Longhorn Screen Saver


iPodWith the growing number of people who own an iPod or a similar portable audio device, each user has access to a storage device capable of transferring a wealth of information in an extremely portable fashion. The double-edged sword is that it poses a great threat to big businesses where loss of data is as easy as someone just walking in and taking all they want through the computer’s USB port. A lot of people are urging enterprises to disable USB ports or Window’s Universal Plug and Play. Should we really sacrifice accessibility for security? Has security become so bad that we must some day do away with hard drives all together and move to data storage in one central location?

Read More | Yahoo! News


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