On Gear Live: Chris Weber interview: The future of device branding for Windows Phone

Latest Gear Live Videos

iTunes 500 MillionWhile every visitor to the Apple homepage will be greeted today by a huge banner proclaiming the company’s monumental sales achievement, only one will be receiving the huge iPod-based prize package for downloading the 500 millionth song from iTunes.  Amy Greer of Lafayette, Indiana pushed Apple over the mark with “Mississippi Girl” by Faith Hill and will be rewarded with 10 iPods, 10000 free songs, and a trip for four to see a Coldplay concert.  While this is an amazing milestone for legal digital music downloads, it’s even more amazing to think that iTunes has sold an average of almost 7 songs to every single living person in the 19 countries it services (feel free to check my math).

Read More | iTunes 500 Million


Advertisement

SanDisk 512 MB TransFlashSanDisk today announced their support of Transflash - although in a somewhat backwards way. They have announced a new product offering called MicroSD - which happens to be identical to and “backwards compatible” with Transflash. The big news here is that they have doubled the size of the thumbnail sized memory cards. A 512 MB card is expected to retail for less the $70 and be available next month. Perfect timing for the supposed iTunes phone from Apple and Motorola. A 1GB and 2GB version are both in the works and should be available in the next year.

Read More | Sandisk MicroSD Press Release


Comcast Speed Upgrade Good news for those of us who are serviced by Comcast for cable and high speed Internet. Beginning in July, Comcast will be upgrading subscribers speeds by a whole 2.0 Mbps at no cost. If you currently subscribe to at least Comcast Expanded Basic Cable TV service or above, the following HSI options are available to you:

6.0/384 - $42.95 - Up from 4.0/384
8.0/768 - $52.95 - Up from 6.0/768

As Comcast just recently upgraded their network just a few months ago, a second speed increase leads me to believe that they are feeling the heat from services like Verizon FIOS.

Read More | Venturus


We have written about the Internet Archive recently and are surprised to see that they are being sued - for providing the archive itself! A Philadelphia law firm was defending a health care company being sued in a trademark violation. The firm used the way-back machine to show the courts old web-pages dating back to 1999 to prove their use of the trademark. Now the plaintiff is filing suit against the Internet Archive for violations of two federal laws: the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. Now I am not a lawyer, but I don’t see how they broke copyright by archiving a copy of a public website, and making it available for the Internet in general.

Read More | NYTimes - Reg Required


Blackberry + Papa John's Pizza In quite possibly the strangest corporate cross-promotion ever Papa John’s is now offering a free (after rebate) Blackberry 7100g phone to customers who place an online order for Pizza, drinks, and a side. A two-year service agreement is required so it sounds like a fairly standard cellular deal to me. What I don’t get is what the link between hot, fresh, cheesy pizza, and cutting edge wireless devices.

Read More | Wireless IQ


Have you ever tried to access a website from your mobile phone only to find that the site wasn’t phone friendly?  That problem will soon become a thing of the past, as the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers has approved the suffix .mobi to be used for mobile phone friendly websites.  Many powerful mobile phone makers and operators lobbied for the suffix, in hope that it will encourage websites to create mobile phone sites and in turn cause consumers to upgrade their phones to those with Internet access.  You can look for the new .mobi websites to be out next year, featuring limited memory and bandwidth fit for a small screen.

Read More | PC Magazine


Apple Many are still baffled as to why Apple switched from IBM’s PowerPC chip to Intel’s X86 chips – especially after Steve Jobs criticized the X86 so much. Jon Stokes from ArsTechnica writes some pretty interesting information regarding this switch, claiming this information has been confirmed by several sources in the know. It boils down to large volume discounts and an MVP like catering to their needs. Most interesting to note is the high possibility of seeing a video iPod very soon due to Intel’s XScale chip that currently powers some color PDAs. This could prove to be a very interesting road we travel in – Apple hand in hand with Intel.

Read More | ArsTechnica


Longhorn BetaMicrosoft has been sending out invatiations to all their beta testers and WinHEC participants.  What’s the occasion you ask?  It’s the Windows Code Name Longhorn beta program, and Microsoft has even rolled out a new beta client to replace WindowsBeta and BetaPlace.  The new OS isn’t avaliable for anyone to download though…apparently the preliminary invitation codes will be unique per user.  If you’re anxious to get your hands on the latest platform from Windows don’t worry, Microsoft should be allowing the public to apply for the beta program later on this summer, and Longhorn will also be apart of the Community Technology Preview program.

Read More | Slashdot


Apple AnnouncementSo, while we were looking forward to Apple making some sort of announcement today, which we had hoped would be along the lines of an official iTunes phone announcement, or maybe something related to the much talked about 14” widescreen iBook. Instead, we get nothing. Gotta love ‘em, they keep us guessing.


The European Parliament overwhelmingly voted to reject a proposed law that would create a single way of patenting software across the European Union.  The final vote, 648-14 vote with 18 abstentions, came Wednesday and is the nail in the coffin for the bill, since the drafters of the law, the head office of the European Commission, say they won’t create another bill.  Many lawmakers have said they believed the measure did not promote innovation and would stifle enterprise, and also that human knowledge cannot be patented.

EICTA, a group representing 10,000 companies including giants such as Nokia and Alcatel SA which had been lobbying for the bill, said the decision to scrap it was wise, given the large number of amendments that threatened to severely narrow the scope of the legislation.  CompTIA, representing small- and medium-sized information technology companies, echoed this view. “Conflicting views have confused the issue and made it difficult for the parliament to reach a clear and balanced decision that would adequately support innovation.”

Read More | USA Today


Advertisement