On Gear Live: Apple Watch announced, available early 2015 for $349

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Apple Mighty MouseApple has gone and made their Mighty Mouse even mightier with news today they were releasing an upgraded product which has wireless Bluetooth built in. The new wireless Mighty Mouse is priced at $69 and available now.

The wireless Mighty Mouse, said Apple, uses Bluetooth 2.0 technology to connect to Bluetooth-enabled Macs and also has a new laser tracking engine which is reportedly 20 times more sensitive than standard optical mice. This is on top of standard features like four independently programmable buttons, a Scroll Ball that lets users scroll in any direction and the ability to be used in single button or multi-button modes.

Read More | Apple Mighty Mouse Product Page

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GraceNotes, which maintains the CDDB database containing music CD information on more than 55 million tracks and 4 million CDs, yesterday said they’d obtained the rights to publish song lyrics of more than 1 million songs, according to Reuters. They are now chatting with their online music partners, including Yahoo and Apple, about “plans to launch a service to offer legal and accurate lyrics for all digital media”. This service would be the first industry-sanctioned want to provide lyrics legally.

Read More | Reuters: Gracenote, music publishers in lyrics deal via iLounge


OS X Browsers

The folks over at Macintalk has done the dirty work for us, putting four major browsers to the test on Mac OS X (although, they disregard Opera completely.) They looked at things such as speed of rendering, RAM usage, Javascript loading, standards compliance, and even RSS handling. Reading through, I must say it is pretty thorough. If you have been wondering if paying for OmniWeb would give you a batter browsing experience on the Mac than sticking with the free Safari, Firefox, or Camino, give this one a read.

Read More | Macintalk

SlingBox Mac

For all you SlingBox lovers out there who have been laboring with the product on your PC, it seems that the time has finally come for the peeps at Sling Media to start supporting the Mac. If you own a SlingBox and want to be one of the pioneer’s of it’s co-coexistence with your Apple computer, you may want to sign up for the Limited Beta. Of course, you need to swear that you won’t speak of any of the testing activities to anyone (but feel free to tell us). If you want in on the beta testing love, you have until July 26 to head on over to the questionnaire.

Read More | Sling Media

iDropsYou ready for the next in line in the whole iPod-targeted product market? This time, it comes by the way of iDrops. Corny pun aside (you know, ‘eye’ drops?! Ha!), the shtick here is that this cleaning fluid is specially tailored to not only clean your iPod, but make it shine like new. It can be used on each and every iPod that has been released (although, not sure why one would need to buy this for a shuffle), and it even comes with a nifty eye dropper. Of course, it’s not the cheapest thing in the world, coming in at $14.95 USD per bottle. I think I’ll just stick with iKlear, as it works on iPods, as well as monitors, HDTV displays, etc.

Read More | iDrops Product Page via UberGizmo


Apple iMacApple said today they were fazing out educational sales of their eMac, their last CRT-based computer, in favor of a new $899 configuration of the 17-inch iMac. This iMac for education is available now for education customers.

The 17-inch iMac for education sports a 1.83 GHz Intel Core Duo processor, a built-in iSight video camera and iLife ‘06, Apple’s latest suite of digital lifestyle applications. It also includes a “Combo drive for burning CDs and reading DVDs, 512MB of 667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM memory expandable up to 2GB and hard drive storage capacity up to 160GB”.

Other features of this educational iMac configuration include built-in 10/100/1000 BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet, built-in 802.11g Wi-Fi for up to 54 Mbps wireless networking, five USB ports (three USB 2.0) and two FireWire 400 ports.

Read More | Apple Education iMac Page

Okay, so, we understand that a nice percentage of our readers are die hard Mac users, enthusiasts, connoisseurs, and the like. Heck, we have a few Macs here at the Gear Live Bleeding Edge headquarters. So what would drive us to want to obliterate a Mac Classic by way of rifle, hand gun, propane, fire, and more? We don’t quite know…but it was certainly fun. Enjoy the 4th!

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Windows VistaWhile it’s a good guess that Windows Vista won’t garner many OS X converts, it will still do fairly well if ComputerWorld’s “20 Reasons Why Windows Vista Will Be Your Next OS” article is any indication.  This article builds upon a prior piece that gave you twenty things you wouldn’t like about Vista, and this time around tries to look at things from a more postive light.

Some of the more notable reasons include, “UAC and You”, which concerns the User Account Controls and also made the prior list of things you wouldn’t like about Vista.  “Power & Performance” provides insights into the new SuperFetch and ReadyBoost features among others, and “Wireless Networking” details the methods of the new wireless features versus the madness of the old way that XP operates.

In closing, the author believes that Vista is on the right track, but that OS X is still a better operating system.

Windows Vista could be the culmination of Windows, the last in a line before a major shift. And Vista fits that role well. It’s not just the best version of Windows ever, it’s the best Windows upgrade ever. In other words, it’s a bigger advance for this time than other versions of Windows were for their time. Windows 95 is the only one that comes close.

Does that make it better than Apple’s Mac OS X? I’m afraid not. OS X is still, all things considered, a better operating system. But OS X is little more than a test tube compared to the vast user base that Windows commands. Vista will have a huge impact on the entire world of computing, while Apple’s OS—which Apple still foolishly insists must run solely on its hardware—continues to languish as the choice of a paltry few. Microsoft wins again.

Read More | ComputerWorld

Apple OS XLooks like Apple has just released the latest Mac OS X Update, bringing Tiger to 10.4.7. The update is recommended for all users and includes general operating system fixes, as well as specific fixes for the following applications and technologies. It includes fixes for:

  • preventing AFP deadlocks and dropped connections
  • saving Adobe and Quark documents to AFP mounted volumes
  • Bluetooth file transfers, pairing and connecting to a Bluetooth mouse, and syncing to mobile phones
  • audio playback in QuickTime, iTunes, Final Cut Pro, and Soundtrack applications
  • ensuring icons are spaced correctly when viewed on desktop
  • determining the space required to burn folders
  • iChat audio and video connectivity, creating chat rooms when using AIM
  • importing files into Keynote 3
  • PDF workflows when using iCal and iPhoto
  • reliable use of Automator actions within workflows
  • importing and removing fonts in Font Book
  • syncing addresses, bookmarks, calendar events and files to .Mac
  • compatibility with third party applications and devices
  • previous standalone security updates

I am on an Intel iMac, and the download clocks in at 133 MB on my end.

Read More | 10.4.7 Details

Benjamin RudolphParallels Desktop has quickly replaced VirtualPC in the eyes of many a Mac user, as the product works (and works well) on Macs running on Intel chips. Throughout it’s beta period, the Parallels Desktop for Mac software grew due to the dedicated help from the Mac community. The product is now out of beta and ready for purchase. We caught up with Parallels’ Benjamin Rudolph to talk about how to they to where they are today:


Ben, thank you for taking some time to talk with us today. Tell us a little about what you do at Parallels.
Good to be here!  I’ll keep this short since I’m the least interesting thing we’ll be talking about today….I lead our marketing and communications efforts here at Parallels, including PR, product marketing, and partner relationships.


How soon after the announcement of the Intel Macs did development of Parallels Desktop for Mac begin?
We started thinking about a Windows-on-Mac solution when Apple made the announcement that they were moving to Intel chips.  Since our virtualization engine was already compatible with the x86 chipset, it was simply a matter of porting the code over to the Mac, refining the API, and getting devices working.

Click to continue reading Gear Live Interview: Benjamin Rudolph, Parallels


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