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Marcus Mumford to Pen Unheard Bob Dylan Tracks

Marcus MumfordMarcus Mumford is using unheard Bob Dylan lyrics for a new project.

The Mumford and Sons frontman has penned new words to unfinished tracks written by the legendary folk singer in the late sixties during his The Basement Tapes period, for a new album entitled Lost On The River: The New Basement Tapes.

"These are not B-level Dylan lyrics. They're lyrics he just never got around to finishing," producer T Bone Burnett - who also worked with Elvis Costello, 59,for the project - told the LA Times newspaper.

Dylan's 1975 album The Basement Tapes was mostly recorded in the basement of the The Band's Big Pink House - a home the Canadian-American rock group shared in New York - after they toured with the singer in 1966, however this time the material is being recorded at Hollywood's Capitol Studios.

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Mumford and Sons Pretend to Be Irish

Mumford and SonsMumford and Sons say convincing people they're Irish is the secret of their success.

The "I Will Wait" band is from England, but their use of traditional instruments - including accordion, mandolin and double bass - and close harmonies means some people mistake them for being from neighboring Ireland. "Everyone thinks we're Irish. There's an Irish bar in every town - it's the secret of our success," keyboard player Ben Lovett said.

Banjo player Winston Marshall also points out the roots of their sound and some of their instruments, such as the banjo, aren't even from Europe, adding, "We're in a long line of English people pretending to be Americans and not being as good as Americans."

The band - also including Marcus Mumford and Ted Dwayne - are known for spending long periods touring around the world, particularly in the US, but aren't huge fans of having to do it in a bus. "I went camping on a stag weekend and hated it. [And] you can't s**t on the bus. You still brush your teeth outside and spit it out, just like on a campsite," Marcus added.

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Mumford and Sons: Glastonbury Is a Risk

Mumford & SonsMumford and Sons aren't sure they can compete with The Rolling Stones at Glastonbury and admit the festival appearance is a big "risk."

The "I Will Wait" band see headlining the world renowned event as the biggest "gamble" they've ever taken, and aren't sure if they can live up to the legacy of their co-headliners - who have been touring for 50 years.

"It's a really huge deal to headline Glastonbury; we're a young band with only two records behind us. This summer is probably the biggest risk we've ever taken," frontman Marcus Mumford said.

Banjo player Winston Marshall added, "I've seen The Stones play for three hours and the crowd knew every song. It's what you want in a headline slot at a festival. I'm scared because it feels like a gamble. We don't know if we've earned it yet or not."

Bass player Ted Dwayne also admits he's getting nervous in the run up to their closing festival slot on Sunday June 30: "The other night was the first time I visualized the [main] Pyramid Stage in my head. I hadn't made that connection before, and it actually real, it's really, really scary."

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Marcus Mumford Denies Babel’s Christian Faith Statement

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Gossip, Folk, Rock, New Releases,

Mumford and Sons' BabelMarcus Mumford denies Babel symbolizes Mumford and Sons' Christian faith. The frontman - whose father was a vicar - insists the album isn't a statement of their religious views and the band are more driven by "spirituality."

"The LP is not a statement of faith. We don't feel evangelical about anything, really, other than music. I don't even call myself a Christian. Spirituality is the word we engage with more. We're fans of faith, no religion," he said.

The "Little Lion Man" singer also clarified his lyrics to "Whisper In The Dark," which reference God. "The lyric, 'I set out to serve the Lord,' no-one realizes it's pluperfect tense. The lyric is 'I had set out to serve the Lord.' It's looking back at a time when that happened," he explained.

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Mumford and Sons Nervous About Headlining Arenas

Mumford and Sons

Mumford and Sons are nervous about headlining arenas. The band have just released their second album Babel and announced a huge run of shows - including their first ever arenas in the UK - and are worried about making their sound big enough to fill such huge spaces.

"We've only ever done five [arenas] I think. We did three in Canada, one in Portland, Oregon and one in Amsterdam and it was quite difficult. Big respect to bands who do arenas because, it's a big space to fill," band member Winston Marshall said. "It's hard to connect but it's also kind of epic and a part of us always wanted to achieve those things," band member Ben Lovett added.

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Mumford and Sons Made Sacrifices for New Album

Mumford and SonsMumford and Sons have made "sacrifices" for their new album.

"The Little Lion Man" band, who formed in December 2007, hope their second record, Babel, will change people's view, after being labeled "folk," a tag they disagree with.

"The cynics can all f**k off. We think this new record will attract a different audience and broaden people's views of us. We have made so many sacrifices and we've not taken the easiest route. And so I hope people do understand where we are coming from because it's a good place, not a capitalistic venture at all," said keyboardist Ben Lovett.

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Mumford and Sons’ People Trafficking Mixup

Mumford and SonsMumford and Sons were once accused of people trafficking.

The British folk band nearly missed a show on an American tour after deciding to travel on a vintage train, which was mistaken by police in Texas as a vehicle used to smuggle people over the Mexican border. "In Marfa, Texas, we were pulled over by police waiting for us with cars across the track. They accused us of stowing people away on the train. It was edgy, but the gig eventually went ahead. We swelled the town about fivefold and ended up playing soccer with the police," said bassist Ted Dwane.

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Mumford and Sons Will Release New Album on September 24

Mumford and Sons

Mumford and Sons will release their new album on September 24. The British folk band revealed in an interview with Dutch pop/rock radio station 3FM that their hotly anticipated follow up to Sign No More is almost complete. The group have once again collaborated with producer Markus Dravs on the record and frontman Marcus Mumford previously revealed they were in no rush to finish it because they wanted to make sure it wasn't "s**t."

"I think we just want the songs to be good, and to sound right, and to feel like we've expressed everything as straightforwardly and honestly as we can. We're done recording it. But if we listen back while we're mixing and discover it's s**t, we'll just start again," he said.

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Mumford and Sons Unveil Their New Track

Mumford and Sons

Mumford and Sons have unveiled a new track, "Learn Me Right." The folk-rock group collaborated with vocalist Birdy - who sings lead on the song - which is included on the soundtrack to new animated film Brave.

"It's quite fun doing a song for a movie rather than for an album. We liked the idea of having an orchestra in the background and having a girl like Birdy sing - it's been quite liberating," frontman Marcus Mumford said.

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Mumford and Sons Complete Album

Mumford and SonsMumford and Sons has finished recording their new album - but may not release it.

The group have been working hard on the follow-up to 2009's Sigh No More and admits they will scrap the record if it doesn't meet their high standards.

"We've done recording it but if we listen back while we're mixing and discover it's s**t then we'll just start again. We're not going to put it out until it's good enough," said keyboard player Ben Lovett.

The band are planning to play new tracks at their summer dates because they enjoy seeing the crowd's response to new material. "Playing the songs like helped shape them because we get to listen to them through the crowd's ears," banjo player Winston Marshall explained to NME magazine.

And the group are quick to reassure fans not to expect a radical departure from their previous material on the new album. "[Frontman] Marcus [Mumford] made a joke that the album wasn't doom folk and we don't really know why he did that. We'd just like to assure everyone that it is doom folk," Winston added.

Gallery: Mumford and Sons Complete Album


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