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Veronica Santiago and Neil Estep review the DVD release of Click in this episode of FilmCrunch.

Michael Newman is married to the beautiful Donna and they have two terrific kids, Ben and Samantha. But he doesn’t get to see them much because he’s putting in long, hard hours at his architectural firm in the elusive hope that his ungrateful boss will one day recognize his invaluable contribution and make him a partner. After staying up all night to work, a tired Michael becomes frustrated because he can’t even figure out which of his remotes will turn on the TV. Michael sets out to find the perfect device to operate all his electronic equipment and stumbles into the back room of a Bed, Bath & Beyond, where an eccentric employee, Morty, gives him an experimental one-of-a-kind souped-up gadget guaranteed to change his life. Soon Michael is master of his domain, turning on every appliance with the click of a button. But the device has more startling functions. It can somehow muffle the barking of Sundance, the family dog—and even more astoundingly, fast forward through an annoying quarrel with his wife. Michael is fascinated by his new toy and a little freaked out as well…

Now we want to hear from you - hit the forums and let us know what you think, what you want us to watch next, and any other recommendations you have for the show.


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Pan's Labyrinth

Pan’s Labyrinth centers on an imaginitive young girl named Ofelia (Ivana Baquero) who is moved with her mother and unborn brother to a military outpost in 1940s postwar Spain.  Her new stepfather, the violent and merciless Captain Vidal (Sergi Lopez), is trying to round up the last of an insurgency living in the surrounding forest.  When Ofelia stumbles upon a fantastical underworld in which she will be made princess, she must prove her worth to a host of mystical creatures while protecting herself and her loved ones from the belligerent captain.  While the film isn’t for children or anyone with an intolerance for graphic violence, it is by far the most visually stunning spectacle of 2006 and leaves one with the faint but distinct desire to believe in the supernatural.

Pan’s Labyrinth is written and directed by Guillermo del Toro.  Rated R.

Click to continue reading Pan’s Labyrinth Review: A Violent but Visual Delight


In this episode, the FilmCrunch crew takes a look at The Last King of Scotland, Infernal Affairs, and the DVD release of Click.

Now we want to hear from you - hit the forums and let us know what you think, what you want us to watch next, and any other recommendations you have for the show.


We review Apocalypto, the latest from Mel Gibson, in this episode of FilmCrunch. Is it worth viewing? Neil and Veronica give you their opinion.

A tale set in the Mayan civilization. When a man’s idyllic presence is brutally disrupted by a violent invading force, he is taken on a perilous journey to a world ruled by fear and oppression where a harrowing end awaits him. Through a twist of fate, and spurred by the power of his love for his woman and his family, he will make a desperate break to return home and to ultimately save his way of life.

Now we want to hear from you - hit the forums and let us know what you think, what you want us to watch next, and any other recommendations you have for the show.


Neil Estep and Veronica Santagio review the DVD release of Idlewild in this episode of FilmCrunch.

Now we want to hear from you - hit the forums and let us know what you think, what you want us to watch next, and any other recommendations you have for the show.


Neil and Veronica review the DVD release of Superman Returns in this episode of FilmCrunch.

Now we want to hear from you - hit the forums and let us know what you think, what you want us to watch next, and any other recommendations you have for the show.


SAG Awards  Oscar, Schmoscar. 

We all want to be liked.  And it feels even better when those you are competing against are doing the liking.  So while winning an Academy Award may get you noticed, winning a SAG award gets you respect

Who cares if a screenwriter votes for you?  And what does a People’s Choice Award really mean?  The Screen Actors Guild Awards is the only show where Film and TV actors are applauded by their peers.

So who was voted Homecoming King and Queen by their classmates this year?  For more on the winners and the coverage, read on!

Click to continue reading The 2007 Screen Actors Guild Awards


Academy Awards Somewhere out there director Bill Condon is trying to wake up from a very bad dream…

Just less than 24 hours ago, I was just telling my cohort Neil Estep that Dreamgirls would be nominated for Best Picture.  Thankfully, no money was involved.  Apparently what I should have said was, “Given that the film won the Golden Globe for Best Comedy/Musical, I think it will probably earn the most nominations this year—but not be nominated for Best Picture.”  My theory?  The voters were so Dreamgirled-out by the time they got to that part of the ballot…

The biggest shocker of the day?  Probably.  But there were plenty others.  And may I saw how excited I am!  Here are some of the more notable additions/omissions from this morning:

  • We have one less Leo DiCaprio nomination in the Best Actor Category (in Blood Diamond, out The Departed) making room for Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson.  Woo hoo!  Is it weird that I’m excited about this nomination…even though I’ve never seen the movie?  But I’ve heard so much about it and have been waiting anxiously for the DVD to come out on on Feb. 13th.  I just love it when underdogs are recognized.  Could this be a surprise win ala Hilary Swank (Boys Don’t Cry) or Adrian Brody (The Pianist)?

Click to continue reading 2007 Academy Award Nominations

Read More | The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Illusionist Poster

The Illusionist takes place in early 20th–century Vienna, where young Eisenheim (Edward Norton), a poor but brilliant magician, falls for a wealthy duchess (Jessica Biel).  Fearing societal ridicule, her family forbids the relationship and the lovers become separated for many years.  When the duchess is engaged to Crown Prince Leopold (Rufus Sewell), Eisenhiem must use his unique skill to regain her heart, distract the nosy Chief Inspector Uhl (Paul Giamatti), and escape the vengeful wrath of the crown prince.  The Illusionist is a focused and introspective story that, unlike its ‘prestigious’ rival, uses mystical effect to flesh out, not upstage, a powerful tale of love.

The Illusionist is directed by Neil Burger and based on a short story by Steven Millhauser.  Rated PG-13.

Click to continue reading The Illusionist DVD Review


ArthurAlthough theater audiences were not offered much new to watch over the four-day weekend, I must say that I was bit surprised as to how the box office totals shook out.  I was certain that Primeval would reign supreme. I mean—when when does a movie about a serial-killing crocodile not come out on top??  And despite Madonna’s participation, I thought Arthur and the Invisibles would place higher than 9th.  Parents are always desperate to find something for their rug rats, right?

Here are the totals for last week (as compiled by Media By Numbers LLC):

1. Stomp the Yard, Sony Screen Gems, $25,876,318
2. Night at the Museum, Fox, $21,847,867
3. The Pursuit of Happyness, Sony, $10,703,352
4. Dreamgirls, Paramount, $10,259,911
5. Freedom Writers, Paramount, $8,849,005
6. Children of Men, Universal, $7,449,555
7. Alpha Dog, Universal, $7,411,750
8. Primeval, Disney, $6,792,318
9. Arthur and the Invisibles, MGM, $5,702,789
10. Charlotte’s Web, Paramount, $5,348,867


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