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Wednesday August 29, 2007 2:58 pm

DVD REVIEW:  God Grew Tired Of Us

God Grew Tired Of UsEvery once in a while you are fortunate enough to watch a movie that really shakes you to your core.  Afterwards, you feel compelled to grab any and everyone you see to tell them about it.  I had that experience just last week—and since then, my friends have had to bear the brunt of my enthusiasm.

Earlier this year, I caught a Nightline piece about the film, God Grew Tired of Us.  This documentary about the ‘Lost Boys of Sudan’ was having it’s Los Angeles premiere.  But the road to completion required a lot of celebrity assistance along the way.  Actor sought ‘s help when his director friend (Christopher Quinn) was running low on funds.  Pitt provided financial assistance and took on an executive producer role.  also contributed as narrator after being asked by actress .

Read More | Nightline

Now, I did know a bit about the plight of the Lost Boys (not counting the Haim/Feldman version) before I watched the documentary.  I had heard about these boys in Africa who had wandered through their country for endless miles.  I also knew that some had eventually been relocated to the United States.  But I was really intrigued and wanted to learn more.  Let me just start off by saying that once I hit ‘play’, I was crying within 10 minutes.  But please don’t let this turn you away.  My husband was initially hesitant to see the film after I told him that—but he thanked me later for forcing him to watch it (I only do things that are in his best interest).

This movie follows the lives of three Sudanese boys (Daniel, Panther and John) over several years of their lives.  We learn that they were forced to flee their homes in the late 1980’s after their villages were destroyed in a civil war.  Additionally, boys were faced with death after the government ordered them to be killed—regardless of age.  Families were separated during the escape and a pack of boys walked for miles to neighboring Ethiopia.  There they lived for three years before needing to leave again.  The group then walked back through Sudan to Kenya on the other side.  In a period of five years, a pack of 27,000 was reduced to 12,000.  Those who managed to survive the long journeys had to endure possible lion or hyena attacks, a lack of water (they drank urine) or absence of food (they often ate mud).  They walked approximately 1,000 miles.

Although they believed their lives would be better in their new Kenyan camp, the boys lived there for an additional ten years with absolutely nothing to look forward to.  They didn’t know if their families were alive and they didn’t have anywhere to go.  Eventually, the US agreed to help resettle some of the boys in America—with the understanding that the government would eventually be repaid for the travel costs.  In this film, you will see the three subjects try and adopt a new culture while working to make better lives for themselves and for those they left behind.  While they are presented with new opportunities, they struggle with the responsibilities, burdens and guilt now placed on their shoulders.

I believe this movie is an absolute

must-watch

for classrooms everywhere….for anyone who feels entitled….for those who feel sorry for themselves.  While the topic seems initially depressing—I promise you this film is at many times comical and always inspirational.  (The movie didn’t win several Sundance Film Awards for nothing).  And best of all?  It’s short.


SPECIAL FEATURES:
  • Audio Commentary with the Director and the Three Lost Boys
  • Finding the Lost Boys Director Christopher Quinn talks about how he discovered the film topic.  The subjects also elaborate on how fortunate they feel to have received new lives.  They also talk about what they are doing to further themselves and their country.
  • Theatrical Trailer


Director: Christopher Quinn
Starring:  John Bul Dau, Panther Bior, Daniel Abul Pach
Rated:  PG (though there are some upsetting images)
Running time:  90 minutes

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