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Neil Estep goes off on the people trying to sue to the makers of Borat. He gives you an overview of what the Borat film is all about, and why it’s really a genious piece of work, being that it is unique with real-life people. Watch out Borat haters…if Neil sees you on the street, he will yell at you, and then run quickly when you reciprocate. If you are unfamiliar with Borat:

Journalist Borat Sagdiyev leaves his native Kazakhstan to travel to America to make a documentary. As he zigzags across the nation, Borat meets real people in real situations with hysterical consequences. His backwards behavior generates strong reactions around him, exposing prejudices and hypocrisies in American culture. In some cases, Borat’s interview subjects embrace his outrageous views on race and sex by agreeing with him, while others attempt to offer a patriotic lesson in Western values.

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Veronica Santiago and Neil Estep review the theatrical release of Casino Royal, the latest James Bond flick.

James Bond’s first 007 mission takes him to Madagascar, where he is to spy on a terrorist Mollaka. Not everything goes as planned and Bond decides to investigate, independently of the MI6 agency, in order to track down the rest of the terrorist cell. Following a lead to the Bahamas, he encounters Dimitrios and his girlfriend, Solange. He learns that Dimitrios is involved with Le Chiffre, banker to the world’s terrorist organizations. Secret Service intelligence reveals that Le Chiffre is planning to raise money in a high-stakes poker game in Montenegro at Le Casino Royale. MI6 assigns 007 to play against him, knowing that if Le Chiffre loses, it will destroy his organization. ‘M’ places Bond under the watchful eye of the beguiling Vesper Lynd. At first skeptical of what value Vesper can provide, Bond’s interest in her deepens as they brave danger together—and even torture at the hands of Le Chiffre. In Montenegro, Bond allies himself with Matthis, MI6’s local field agent, and Felix Leiter, who is representing the interests of the CIA. The marathon game proceeds with dirty tricks and violence, raising the stakes beyond blood money and reaching a terrifying climax.

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Veronica Santiago and Neil Estep review the DVD release of Al Gore’s eye-opening film, An Inconvenient Truth, in this episode.

A look at former Vice President Al Gore’s commitment to expose the myths and misconceptions that surround global warming and inspire actions to prevent it. Gore, who, in the wake of the defeat in the 2000 election, re-set the course of his life to focus on an all-out effort to help save the planet from irrevocable change. With 2005, the worst storm season ever experienced in America just behind us, it seems we may be reaching a tipping point—and Gore pulls no punches in explaining the dire situation. Interspersed with the bracing facts and future predictions is the story of Gore’s personal journey: from an idealistic college student who first saw a massive environmental crisis looming; to a young Senator facing a harrowing family tragedy that altered his perspective; to the man who almost became President but instead returned to the most impassioned cause of his life—convinced that there is still time to make a difference.

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Neil and Veronica are back with another full episode of FilmCrunch, this time reviewing Casino Royale, The Da Vinci Code on DVD, and An Inconvenient Truth. Neil also gets into some detailed feelings on the movie Borat, putting all the people out there looking to sue the makers of the film in their place. Oh, and he also doesn’t wear glasses this time around. Can it get any better? Quite honestly…no, it can’t. Check out the video to see for yourself.

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Neil Estep and Veronica Santiago review the controversial Death of a President in this episode.

An unknown gunman assassinates George W. Bush. A couple of years later, an investigative documentary is made. It features all the people involved that fateful day: the protestors outside a Chicago hotel; the suspects in the shooting and their families; the Secret Service men who failed to protect their charge; the press; and an array of experts, desperately seeking meaning in this horrible act of violence. We learn, agonizingly, what happened to America after the death of a president.

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Neil Estep and Veronica Santiago review the DVD release of Monster House in this episode of FIlmCrunch.

Twelve-year-old DJ Walters, who is caught in that awkward moment between childhood and the onset of puberty, has too much time on his hands and has taken it into his head that there’s something weird about old man Nebbercracker’s house across the street. Things keep disappearing into the dilapidated structure: basketballs, tricycles, toys and pets. Come to think of it, whatever happened to Mrs. Nebbercracker? It’s the day before Halloween and DJ and his candy-friendly pal Chowder have a run-in with Mr. Nebbercracker after their basketball wanders onto his lawn and is mysteriously swept into the house. When the house tries to swallow their new friend Jenny and no one believes the frightened trio’s claims that the house is up to no good, it’s up to them to investigate. They turn for his advice to the only person on the planet who might even remotely understand what’s going on, the wise one they call Skull, a 20-something slacker pizza chef and master of the arcade machine who once played a video game for four days straight on one singly quarter, a gallon of chocolate milk and an adult diaper. “I have heard tell of man-made structures becoming possessed by a human soul,” Skull tells them. You mean the house is alive? Yikes! Skull tells them the only way to stop the house from gulping down everything in sight is by striking at its heart, which the kids figure out must be the perpetually-fueled furnace in the basement. They come up with what seems to be a foolproof plan—a vacuum cleaner disguised as a human dummy filled with cold medicine. The kids offer up their bait to the house, figuring that once it’s asleep, they can sneak in and put out the furnace with their squirt guns. Their little plan goes awry, though, and when the house starts chasing them down the street—that’s right, chasing them down the street!—they must join forces to once again make the neighborhood safe for trick or treaters.

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Neil Estep and Veronica Santiago review the Limited Edition Platinum DVD release of The Little Mermaid in this episode of FilmCrunch, the animated screen version of Hans Christian Andersen’s story of a mermaid named Ariel, who falls in love with an earthly prince. We were glad to see this one come out of the infamous vault, as it’s a classic. And hey - it even comes with an uber chic bracelet! Can’t go wrong with this one, folks.

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Kiss Like StarAuthor William Cane (real name Michael Christian) is widely considered to be the foremost authority on kissing.  His best-selling book, The Art of Kissing, put him on the map in the early nineties and helped spur several similar ventures, including a DVD about kissing, a book of kiss-related celebrity quotes, and The Art of Hugging.  Cane’s newest foray, however, focuses more specifically on kissing in the movies.  Kiss Like a Star: Smooching Secrets from the Silver Screen will guide you frame by tantalizing frame through some of the steamiest on-screen kisses in cinematic history, from Casablanca to The Notebook, and everything in-between.  The book also outlines over 50 different types of movie kisses and how to apply them to your love life, and asks the stars themselves how they prepare for that passionate (or awkward) moment.

We just have one question here at FilmCrunch: what about all those single folks out there with no one to kiss?  Cane has a solution.  In a recent Reuters interview he posited, “Make a little mouth with your left hand.  Take your right thumb and put it through.  You can actually practice a French kiss on your hand.”  We think kissing one’s hand may be a bit too degrading, so we tried writing “Naomi Watts” or “Daniel Craig” on the front.  Much better.

Kiss Like a Star: Smooching Secrets from the Silver Screen hits shelves February 9th.

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Neil Estep and Veronica Santiago review the theatrical release of The Last King of Scotland in this episode of FilmCrunch.

A Scottish doctor on a Ugandan medical mission becomes irreversibly entangled with one of the world?s most barbaric figures: Idi Amin. Impressed by Dr. Garrigan?s brazen attitude in a moment of crisis, the newly self-appointed Ugandan President Amin hand picks him as his personal physician and closest confidante. Though Garrigan is at first flattered and fascinated by his new position, he soon awakens to Amin?s savagery—and his own complicity in it. Horror and betrayal ensue as Garrigan tries to right his wrongs and escape Uganda alive.

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Neil Estep and Veronica Santiago review the theatrical release of Babel in this episode of FilmCrunch. If you truly don’t get enough out of this in-depth video review, there is always our text Babel review as well, which seems to be all the rage as far as controvery is concerned. On to the Babel synopsis:

In the remote sands of the Moroccan desert, a rifle shot rings out—detonating a chain of events that will link an American tourist couple‚Äôs frantic struggle to survive, two Moroccan boys involved in an accidental crime, a nanny illegally crossing into Mexico with two American children and a Japanese teen rebel whose father is sought by the police in Tokyo. Separated by clashing cultures and sprawling distances, each of these four disparate groups of people are nevertheless hurtling towards a shared destiny of isolation and grief. In the course of just a few days, they will each face the dizzying sensation of becoming profoundly lost—lost in the desert, lost to the world, lost to themselves—as they are pushed to the farthest edges of confusion and fear as well as to the very depths of connection and love.

The crew also takes a look at the DVD release of Monster House, and chimes in with a bit of movie industry news.

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